Tag: Carpal Tunnel

A Thanksgiving warning

Thanksgiving is next week, as you all know. We work just a little half week next week and it’s always very, very busy. So this is the week to come on in and see us – we are in Monday through Friday. Call us and we will get you in. 303.300.0424.
We can help you with:

Back pain
Neck pain
Headaches
Shoulder problems
Hip and sciatica problems
Wrists and hands
Knees and ankles

We have 2 spots open on our schedule today (11/9) and 1 tomorrow (11/10)

We have 2 spots open on our schedule today (11/9) and 1 tomorrow (11/10). Yes we are open on Veterans’ Day. Call now to get in to see us. Why spend the weekend in pain?

303.300.0424.
We can help you with:

Back pain
Neck pain
Headaches
Shoulder problems
Hip and sciatica problems
Wrists and hands
Knees and ankles

Denver Chiropractor is back from Hawai’i

Aloha! My family and I are back from Hawai’i and Denver Chiropractic Center is open and ready to help you. We had an amazing week on the Big Island, and while it’s always tough for a vacation to come to an end, Colorado sure is a great place to come home to.

Here we are on the beach with the boogie boards.

And here is the view when you approach Mauna Kea’s Beach

Anyway, we are back in the office and we can help you with:

Back pain
Neck pain
Headaches
Shoulder problems
Hip and sciatica problems
Wrists and hands
Knees and ankles

Just call us 303.300.0424

(2/27/2017) Short Week Alert and win Rockies tickets

Short Week Alert. We will have a short week this week in our office, so if you need to get in this week please don’t hesitate to call 303.300.0424 ASAP or reply to this email.

 

Monday 2/27: In the office

Tuesday 2/28: In the office

Weds 3/1: In the office

Thursday 3/2: Out of the office

Friday 3/3: Out of the office

 

Coming soon- Win Rockies Tickets!Yep, the Avs ticket giveaways have been so popular that I got Rockies tickets to keep the party going all summer long. Just keep watching for our emails!

 

Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News.

 
Concussions May Accelerate Alzheimer’s.
A new study suggests concussions may speed up mental decline among individuals already at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, researchers examined 160 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and found that concussions seemed to accelerate Alzheimer’s disease-related brain deterioration and mental decline in the veterans at genetic risk for the disease. Dr. Jasmeet Hayes, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine writes, “Our results suggest that when combined with genetic factors, concussions may be associated with accelerated cortical thickness and memory decline in Alzheimer’s disease-relevant areas.”
Brain, January 2017

Diet: Eating Rare Meat Safely.
If you prefer your meat cooked rare versus well done, it is important that it is prepared safely. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests: use a food thermometer to make sure rare meat is hot enough to destroy any germs; avoid using the color of meat, the color of juices, or the firmness of meat to determine if it’s sufficiently cooked; cook ground lamb, pork, veal, or beef to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit (71.11 degrees Celsius) at its center; and cook steak to 145 degrees Fahrenheit (62.77 degrees Celsius) at its center.
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, January 2017

Exercise: Set a Health Goal That Lasts.
Did you make a New Year’s resolution to become healthier? The American Council on Exercise offers the following tips to help one continue to strive towards their goal as the year progresses: set a small, specific, actionable goal, such as going for a walk every other day; view your goal as a positive change that you want to see in yourself; don’t make your goal so challenging that you are likely to get frustrated; reward yourself for meeting the goal; and ask for support from family, friends, and loved ones.
American Council on Exercise, January 2017

Chiropractic: Surgery No More Effective Than Conservative Care for Disk Herniations in the Long-Term.
A recent study sought to compare the effectiveness of surgical and conservative treatment for patients with a lumbar disk herniation in regards to sciatica symptom severity and quality of life. Researchers followed 370 lumbar disk herniation patients for 104 weeks and found that surgical treatment did not show a benefit over conservative treatment during long-term follow-up. The findings suggest that conservative care has the same long-term effects as surgery for lumbar disk herniation but with less cost and associated risk.
BMJ Open, December 2016

Wellness/Prevention: How to Avoid Feeling Tired.
If you’re not getting enough sleep and feel groggy when you wake up, you don’t need to turn to caffeine to stay awake. The National Sleep Foundation recommends the following to feel more alert: avoid alcohol before bed; set a sleep schedule, waking and going to sleep at the same time every day—even on weekends; set your alarm for the time you truly need to wake up; open the curtains to let in natural sunlight as soon as you wake; exercise daily; and eat a nutritious and balanced breakfast.
National Sleep Foundation, January 2017

Feb 23, 2017: 2 Spots Left this week:

2 Spots Left this week: We have just 2 spots open this week, 1 today (Feb 23) and 1 tomorrow (Feb 24). So if you want to get in this week please call asap 303.300.0424 or reply to this email.

Short week next week: Next week is a short week for us as I’ll be out on Thursday and Friday, March 2 and 3. Next week is filling up fast so please on our schedule before it is full.

Back in the office Feb 13, 2017

After taking a few days off last week to help my wife through her ACL (knee) reconstruction surgery – it went very well – I am back in the office today. Thanks for your patience. We have just one spot open today so if you need us, please call asap 303.300.0424.

Feb 6, 2017- Short week alert

I’ll be in just Monday-Wednesday this week as I’m taking Thursday and Friday off for my wife’s ACL reconstruction surgery. So call us ASAP if you want to see us. 303.300.0424

Nutritional Post-Surgical Management of CTS

Obviously, the goal of all health care providers, including chiropractic management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS), is to AVOID surgical intervention, but this is not always possible. Last month, we looked at herbal approaches to reduce inflammation with the focused goal of preventing surgical need. But, as chiropractors, we also care for patients post CTS surgery, and one of our treatment approaches beyond manual therapies includes nutritional management (In addition to Active Release Techniques to address scar tissue in the forearm muscles).

As we all know, during the surgical process, tissue damage occurs due to incisions, removal of injured tissue, and other factors. Depending on the “success” of the surgical procedure, damage to the nerves causing numbness, weakness, and/or other nerve related symptoms can occur. Often, nerves will regenerate during the healing process but not always 100%. This may be due to factors such as the amount of tissue damaged during the surgery, the length of time CTS had been present pre-surgery, how well the patient follows post-surgical instructions, as well as the general health and overall condition of the patient. A healthy diet along with certain specific vitamins can play a positive role in tissue healing and nerve regeneration. Here are some examples:

  1. Folate or vitamin B9 has been reported to have beneficial effects on the genes located within the nerve cells that help to regulate the healing process. One study published in 2010 reported that folate helped to promote nerve repair in the central nervous system (CNS) in rats, which is unique as typically nerve damage in the CNS does not usually regenerate. Anti-inflammatory benefits have also been reported with vitamins B6, B9, and B12.
  2. Cobalamin or Vitamin B12 has also been reported to facilitate nerve regeneration after injury. This, along with the anti-inflammatory benefits, supports the use of B12 in the post-surgical CTS patient.
  3. Vitamin D may also play a significant role in nerve regeneration after surgery. In one study, vitamin D2 was found to have a positive effect on nerve regeneration. Another study reported that D3 and calcium together has strong anti-inflammatory benefits.
  4. Vitamin B6: There is evidence that supports the use of B6 both before and after surgery. Some feel B6 acts directly on nerve repair and others report a diuretic (fluid reducing) benefit. One cause and/or complication of CTS is fluid retention, which commonly occurs in conditions such as pregnancy, the use of birth control pills, obesity, diabetes, and others. Thus, keeping fluids in our tissues under control can certainly help CTS patients. Most studies agree that less than 200mg of B6 per day is safe. The dosage should be carefully monitored as numbness/tingling (a common CTS symptom) can be a sign of B6 toxicity.
  5. Vitamin C has long been reported to facilitate in the wound healing process. It also is an effective anti-inflammatory agent, a common problem in the cause of CTS as well as a negative post-surgical side effect. A dose of 1000-3000mg/day spread out throughout the day is beneficial to the post-surgical healing process.
  6. Vitamin E: As far back as 1967, Vitamin E been reported to reduce inflammation. More recent studies report that when used in combination with vitamin C, the two together works even better in reducing inflammation than either one alone. Also, this combination was found to improve the body’s ability to use insulin, which may also facilitate healing in the post-surgical CTS patient.

There are many others we didn’t get to (such as B1, 3, 5; zinc, Bromelain, and Quercetin). Bottom line: Eat healthy, exercise, don’t smoke, and fortify your diet with these nutrients!

We realize you have a choice in who you consider for your health care provision and we sincerely appreciate your trust in choosing the Active Release certified chiropractors at Denver Chiropractic Center for those needs.  If you, a friend or family member require care for CTS, we would be honored to render our services.

Fibromyalgia – Where Does the Pain Come From?

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a very strange condition. Can you think of any other condition that creates so many symptoms and yet all the blood and imaging tests are negative? FM symptoms include chronic fatigue, muscle aches and pains, depression, sleep disturbance, memory affects, and more. The degree or severity of FM varies from mild to severe, leaving some totally disabled and distraught. So, the question of the month is, where does the pain come from?

Since the usual markers of injury are negative (that is, blood and other tests), we can tell you first that the pain is NOT coming from damaged tissue such as muscle, bone, organs, and the like. If it did, abnormal enzymes &/or inflammatory tests would result. Rather, the origin of pain appears to be arising from within the central nervous system. That is to say, there are portions of the brain and spinal cord where pain signals are received and when they reach a certain level or threshold, the sensation is felt. When the sensory input is below that level, it will not be felt. In fact, there are MANY MORE incoming sensory signals that are NOT felt compared to those that are. This “thermostat-like” function is vital so we DO NOT feel everything that arrives to the brain. This is why we don’t feel the clothes hanging from our backs or the shoes on our feet (unless the laces are tied too tight!). It’s been said that if we DID “sense” all the incoming signals we would, in a sense, “…short circuit.”

In the FM patient, this thermostat is “messed up.” It is set lower than what is considered normal, and as a result, patients do sense or feel more than they should. This “nervous system overload,” sometimes referred to as a “sensory storm,” occurs in the FM sufferer. A more fancy term called “central sensitization” can be searched and you will find a LOT to read about this interesting subject (check it out)!

So how does this hypersensitive situation start? Fibromyalgia is classified into two main categories – type I and type II. In type I, or primary FM, the cause is unknown. The cause could include one’s genetic make-up, but the bottom line is, we really don’t know. In type II or, secondary FM, some other known condition or situation can be identified such as irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, after a trauma, or following an illness or infection. Some also feel the lack of sleep or sleep loss can cause FM. This is because it takes about four hours of sustained sleep to reach deep sleep, and because of frequent sleep interruptions, the person never reaches deep sleep. Over time, deprived of the relaxing deep sleep benefits, the body gradually tightens up, “re-setting the thermostat” and too much sensory information reaches the brain, resulting in overload, and a heightened pain level is perceived. Studies have shown that when sleep is restored, many FM patients gradually improve and function better. This focus on sleep restoration is important in the management strategies of FM treatment. We all know our tolerance to just about everything suffers when we are over-tired, similar to the toddler who cries at the drop of a dime when they need a nap.

Chiropractic adjustments, certain nutrients like melatonin, valerian root, and vitamin B complex can facilitate sleep restoration. Treatment for sleep apnea can also help patients with FM. As we’ve said before, FM is usually multi-factorial and including chiropractic in the FM treatment “team” is essential for a satisfying result!

If you, a friend or family member requires care for FM, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services!

“Harder than a Half-Ironman,” Dr. Glenn’s Race Report (pic), and the 1-Page Health News (w/video)

My friend and fellow Altitude Multisport club member Justin Chester summed up Xterra Beaver Creek perfectly, “That’s harder than a Half-Ironman!” I don’t know about that since I’ve never done a Half-Ironman. But I do know this: Beaver Creek, for such a posh place, serves up one tough off-road triathlon course. For the record, I did the Sprint version.

I’m never too focused to high-five my kids at the bike-run transition!

Overall, I had a good day. My swim was slower than last year, possibly related to my lack of swim training this year. I guess I shouldn’t have taken 7 months out the pool after last season? The bike and run were about the same as last year (maybe a tad slower). Overall I was only 4 minutes off of last year’s time. I’ll take it! Next up is Xterra Indian Peaks at Eldora ski resort this coming Saturday. That’s right, 2 Saturdays in a row.

Weekly Health Update
Week of: Monday, July 22th, 2013
“A healthy outside starts from the inside.”
~ Robert Urich

Mental Attitude: Obsessed With Forbidden Pleasures.
When individuals are forbidden from everyday objects, their minds and brains pay more attention to them. Obsession is not as strong if others are also denied. When an object is forbidden to a group, the allure of the object drops dramatically. This helps to explain why group diet programs can be more successful than dieting alone.
Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, June 2013

Health Alert: Kids Poisoned.
Every 10 minutes a child in the United States is taken to the Emergency Room because of poisoning from swallowing a prescription or over-the-counter medicine. The most common drugs associated with children’s poisoning include those used to treat diabetes, high cholesterol (statins), pain (opioids), and cardiovascular diseases (beta blockers).
Pediatrics, June 2013

Diet: Soda, Illegal Drugs, and Teeth.
Drinking large quantities of soda can be as damaging to your teeth (tooth erosion) as methamphetamine and crack cocaine use. Tooth erosion occurs when acid wears away tooth enamel. Without enamel, teeth are more susceptible to developing cavities, as well as becoming sensitive, cracked, and discolored. The citric acid present in both regular and diet soda is known to have a high potential for causing tooth erosion. The ingredients used in preparing methamphetamine can include extremely corrosive materials such as battery acid, lantern fuel, and drain cleaner. Crack cocaine is also highly acidic in nature.
General Dentistry, June 2013

Exercise: Quantity Over Frequency?
A study of over 2,300 Canadian adults found that those who exercised 150 minutes over just a few days of the week received the same health benefits as those who spread out 150 minutes of exercise over the entire week.
Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, June 2013

Chiropractic: Success!
A study compared the effectiveness of manual therapy (performed by a Chiropractor), physical therapy (performed by a Physical Therapist), and medical care (delivered by a Medical Physician) for patients with neck pain. The success rate at 7 weeks was twice as high for the chiropractic therapy group (68.3%) compared to the medical care group. Patients receiving chiropractic therapy had fewer absences from work than patients receiving physical therapy or medical care for their neck pain. Manual therapy and physical therapy also resulted in statistically significant less analgesic (pain relief medication) use.
Annals of Internal Medicine, 2002

Wellness/Prevention: Prevent Stress.
Among women who reported stress, 40% had psychosomatic symptoms in the form of aches and pain in their muscles and joints, 28% suffered from headaches or migraines, and 28% reported gastrointestinal complaints. (Note- I’m sure men would have reported even more complaints, as everyone knows women are the tougher gender.)
University of Gothenburg, June 2013

As always, thanks for reading,