Month: May 2016

Denver Chiropractor is ready to help with back pain, neck pain and more!

Don’t let pain, injury or stiffness get in the way of your summer. We are here to help you. We are also here to help your friends or family. Dr. Hyman has 18 years of experience treating back pain, neck pain and headaches. He also gets great results with shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees and ankles. There is no reason to let pain slow you down, whether it’s new or old.

injury post card_Page_1

Call us today at 303.300.0424 and get ready to get back in the game! Or just reply to this email and get straight to Jessica at the front desk. We look forward to helping you!

 

Attention men over 40, you can restore the Warrior Within– If you are interested in losing weight, building muscle, and getting rid of fatigue / irritability (or other symptoms), we have something new for you. Natural hormone balance for men is a way to optimize testosterone and cortisol levels naturally – no dangerous drugs or untested herbs – using diet, training and coaching from a fellow over-40 guy who understands (Me: I fixed myself up using these exact protocols). If you’re interested you can learn more on our website: http://www.denverback.com/forMen-Over-40.

 

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

 Diet: The Good & Bad News About Higher Calcium Intake.
According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), men aged 51-70 should consume 1,000 mg of calcium daily, increasing to 1,200 mg at age 71. NIH experts also recommend that women take in 1,200 mg of calcium daily starting at age 51. In a new study, a research team analyzed the calcium intake as well as the heart disease, stroke, and fracture risk of 2,199 men and 2,704 women over 50 years of age. The team found that participants who had a higher calcium intake had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than those with a lower calcium intake; however, the analysis found the risk of fracture or stroke did not significantly decrease among those with a higher calcium intake.
The Endocrine Society, April 2016

Exercise: Just 75 Minutes of Exercise Per Week Has Benefits!
The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality, accounting for approximately 3.2 million deaths annually. Past evidence suggests that regular physical activity can lead to risk reductions of at least 20-30% for more than 25 chronic health conditions and premature mortality. However, the ideal amount and intensity of exercise to recommend to the general public is still a topic that’s hotly debated among the experts. Current physical activity guidelines recommend 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise per week, but a new review of the published literature indicates that just half this level of activity may still lead to noticeable health benefits. The authors of the review write, “There is compelling evidence that health benefits can be accrued at a lower volume and/or intensity of physical activity. These health benefits are seen in both healthy and clinical populations.”
Canadian Journal of Cardiology, April 2016

Chiropractic: How Does Obesity Increase the Risk of Low Back Pain?
Obesity is known to be an independent risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders; however, the mechanism behind the association between obesity and lower back pain is not yet fully understood. In an effort to add to the available research, Nigerian scientists investigated the spinal curvature of 300 individuals of varying body shapes/sizes and found those with both an above-normal body mass index and waist-hip ratio were more likely to have greater curvature in the lumbar spine. This suggests the spines of those who are overweight or obese have an increased curve (“sway back”) to accommodate a greater load which the researchers speculate may increase their risk for developing lower back pain.
Patient Preference and Adherence, March 2016

Denver Chiropractor Glenn Hyman presents Denver Chiropractic Center’s 1-Page Health News.

Daily Apple Consumption Helps the Heart.
Consuming fresh fruit, such as apples, each day appears to reduce the risk of dying from either a heart attack or stroke by about one-third. Investigators collected data on more than 500,000 adults between 2004 and 2009 and found that fewer than one-in-five ate fruit on a daily basis. However, the researchers found that those who ate about a half cup of fruit a day had a significantly lower risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Lead researcher Dr. Liming Li reports that participants who ate fruit the most often had lower blood pressure and blood sugar compared to those who ate less fruit, which could explain the reduced risk for heart attacks and stroke.
New England Journal of Medicine, April 2016

 

 

 

Mental Attitude: Sleepless Nights Linked to Changes in the Brain.
Chinese researchers report that insomnia may lead to abnormalities in the white matter of the brain, the tissue which carries information between the various parts of the organ. For the study, the researchers recruited 23 patients with primary insomnia and 30 healthy volunteers. The participants completed surveys that allowed investigators to evaluate their mental status and sleep patterns. Using an advanced MRI technique, the research team also looked at the pattern of water movement in white matter to identify any irregularities. They found that participants with insomnia had significantly reduced white matter integrity in several regions of the brain including the thalamus, which regulates consciousness, sleep, and alertness, as well as the corpus callosum, the area that connects the two halves of the brain. Researcher Dr. Shumei Li notes, “Our results can potentially provide the evidence about how the lack of sleep may lead to the impairment of white matter related to emotional or cognitive disorders.”
Radiology, April 2016

Health Alert: Diabetes Has Quadrupled Worldwide Since 1980.
According to a new report, the number of men and women diagnosed with diabetes around the globe increased from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014, with the most severe increases noted in low- and middle-income countries. Experts say these findings should sound an alarm for large-scale, effective action that focuses on reducing the health and economic impact of diabetes.
The Lancet, April 2016

 

Exercise: Too Few Children Get 60 Minutes of Exercise Daily.
In this study, investigators observed 453 schoolchildren during a one-week period and found that only 15% achieved the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) each day. Furthermore, compared with normal or underweight children, the researchers report that the overweight and obese children in the study were be less active overall and achieved fewer minutes of MVPA during school, out-of-school, and on weekends. Senior author Dr. Jennifer Sacheck comments, “Clearly, schools need to be aware of this disparity and should focus on increasing all intensities of physical activity equally for all children across the school-day.”
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, March 2016

Chiropractic: Musculoskeletal Pain Common in Veterans.
A recent study investigated the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among United States veterans. The study included 5,237,763 former soldiers and found that non-traumatic joint pain (27%), back pain (25%), and osteoarthritis (21%) are the most commonly reported and treated musculoskeletal disorders among those who received Veterans Health Administration care. The findings show that musculoskeletal complaints are highly prevalent, painful, and costly disorders among veterans.
Pain, March 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Vitamin D Levels Linked to Cardiovascular Disease Risk.
New research suggests that the risk of cardiovascular disease could be predicted by measuring levels of total and bioavailable vitamin D in both men and women. The study analyzed the vitamin D levels of 4,200 individuals aged 52-76 and assessed whether vitamin D levels had any effect on future cardiac events. The findings revealed that individuals with low levels of both total vitamin D and bioavailable vitamin D were at the greatest risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and even cardiovascular death.
American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions in Chicago, April 2016