Tag: Headaches

Back in the office Feb 13, 2017

After taking a few days off last week to help my wife through her ACL (knee) reconstruction surgery – it went very well – I am back in the office today. Thanks for your patience. We have just one spot open today so if you need us, please call asap 303.300.0424.

Feb 6, 2017- Short week alert

I’ll be in just Monday-Wednesday this week as I’m taking Thursday and Friday off for my wife’s ACL reconstruction surgery. So call us ASAP if you want to see us. 303.300.0424

Who would you call? And This Week’s 1-Page Health News.

By now most of you who read these posts know that my wife blew out her ACL a couple of weeks ago and is having knee surgery soon to reconstruct it. But there’s a part of the story I haven’t shared yet.

When she went down on the slopes of Winter Park, I had a wife yelling in pain, 3 kids kind of freaking out, and I had no idea how to get a hold of the ski patrol. I sat there kind of dumbly watching other skiers and boarders going by hoping that maybe a ski school instructor would appear.

Luckily a good Samaritan stopped and had the ski patrol phone number on a laminated piece of paper in his pocket. I called from my phone and they were there in minutes. 

The moral of the story- know the number for the ski patrol where you are skiing or riding. We’re in the process of putting a card together for you all with the popular ski resorts’ patrol numbers on it. (Winter Park’s is 970.726.1480.)

 

Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News.

 

Diet: Are Low-Carb Diets Better for Weight Loss Than Low-Fat Diets?
Physicians at Mayo Clinic say that low-carb diets are slightly better than low-fat diets for weight loss, at least in the short term. An analysis of 41 trials that evaluated the effects of low-carb diets on weight loss showed that participants lost between 2.5-9 more pounds (1.13-4.08 kg) than those who followed a low-fat diet. Lead researcher Dr. Heather Fields adds, “The best conclusion to draw is that adhering to a short-term low-carb diet appears to be safe and may be associated with weight reduction.” However, she recommends that people who follow a low-carb diet should avoid highly processed foods, especially processed meats, such as bacon, sausage, deli meats, hot dogs, and ham.
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, December 2016

Exercise: Serious Yoga Injuries Are on the Rise, But Rare.
Yoga has become increasingly more popular in recent years and so have yoga-related injuries. According to a new report, nearly 30,000 Americans visited the emergency room for yoga-related sprains, fractures, or other injuries between 2001 and 2014. Despite rising injuries, experts say that overall, yoga appears relatively safe. They add that the potential gains from performing yoga, such as lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol, lower heart rate, and improvements in depression, anxiety, and sleep problems outweigh the risk of injury. Dr. Joshua Harris from the Houston Methodist Hospital comments, “My advice to people is to start slow, don’t push too hard, and find a good instructor who emphasizes proper form and technique.”
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, December 2016

Chiropractic: You Can’t Blame Acute Low Back Pain on the Weather.
A recent study investigated the influence of various weather parameters on the risk of developing an episode of low back pain. Among a group of 981 patients with an acute episode of low back pain, researchers found that precipitation, humidity, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, and air pressure did not increase the risk of onset for acute low back pain.
Pain Medicine, December 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Depression Hurts Smoking Cessation Efforts.
An analysis of data from a Czech smoking cessation clinic reveals that smokers with depression have a harder time quitting. The study included 3,775 patients and found that those with mild depression were 32% less likely to abstain from smoking for one year than those without depressive symptoms, while patients with severe depression were 43% less likely to quit.
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, December 2016

Fibromyalgia and the Immune System

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a condition with a polarized audience comprised of those who believe it’s real and those who don’t. This interesting political-like conflict is, in a large part, centered around the topic we discussed last month concerning the causes of FM. This month’s article will focus specifically on the immune system and its relationship to FM.

“EXTRA, EXTRA, READ ALL ABOUT IT! New research published on 12-17-12 in BMC Clinical Pathology describes cytokine abnormalities were found in FM patients when compared to healthy controls.” OK! But what does that mean?

Very simply, this study reports that immune dysfunction is part of the cause of FM. The most exciting part is that this study identified a BLOOD TEST (finally!) that, “…demonstrates value as a FM diagnostic tool.” Looking at this closer, the researchers used multiple methods to examine cytokine (proteins that help regulate our immune response) blood levels in FM patients. They found the FM group had, “…considerably lower cytokine concentration than the control group, which implies that cell-mediated immunity is impaired in fibromyalgia.” This study’s findings of an immune response abnormality strays from previous study findings which largely pointed to the central nervous system (CNS – brain & spinal cord) as the origin of the FM syndrome.

This makes some sense as the study of immunology (in this case, “neuroimmunology” – the combination of neurology and immunology) has only been around for about 10 years, and as such, may hold some important answers as more evidence is uncovered to further support this potential “paradigm shift” in considering the primary cause of FM. The authors offer further excitement as this focus could lead to a better understanding of the cause of other neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS)! They go on by describing how body temperature, behavior, sleep, and mood can all be negatively affected by “pro-inflammatory cytokines” (PIC) which are released by certain types of activated white blood cells during infection. PIC have been found in the CNS in patients with brain injury, during viral and bacterial infections, and in other neurodegenerative processes (like MS)!

To further support this advance in understanding, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reported, “…Despite the brain’s status as an immune privileged site, an extensive bi-directional communication takes place between the nervous and the immune system in both health and disease.” They describe multiple signaling pathways that exist between the brain and the immune system that function normally throughout our lifetime. When immune, physiological, and psychological “stressors” occur, cytokines and other immune molecules stimulate interactions within the endocrine (our hormone) system, nervous system and immune system.

To prove this, brain cytokine levels go up following stress exposure and similarly go down when treatments are applied that alleviate stress. They list other conditions such as stroke, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s disease, MS, pain, and AIDS-associated dementia as being similarly affected as well. They also report that cytokines and other neuro-chemicals play a role in our neuro-development throughout our lifespan, help regulate brain development early in life and brain function throughout life, and how this all changes in the aging brain. There are also interactions of these immune chemicals that result in gender differences on brain function and behavior.

Needless to say, it will be very interesting to watch for additional developments along this line of research as it pertains to the FM patient and future treatment recommendations! Also, immune stimulation by chiropractic adjustments has been postulated as a benefit and this too may be better understood using this new research approach!

If you, a friend or family member requires care for FM, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing Denver Chiropractic Center!

Car Accident injuries – Whiplash Facts

Whiplash is a slang term for cervical acceleration, deceleration syndrome, or CAD. There are facts and myths surrounding the subject of whiplash. Let’s look at some of the facts.

The origin of CAD. The history of CAD dates back to a time prior to the invention of the car. The first case of severe neck pain arose from a train collision around the time of 1919 and was originally called “railroad spine.” The number of whiplash injuries sharply rose after the invention of cars due to rear-end crashes.

Whiplash synonyms. As stated previously, the term “cervical acceleration-deceleration disorder, or CAD, is a popular title as it explains the mechanism of injury, where in the classic rear-end collision, the neck is initially extended back as the car is propelled forward, leaving the head hanging in space. Once the tissues stretch enough in the front of the neck, the head and neck flex forward very rapidly, forcing the chin towards the chest. This over stretches the soft tissues in the back of the neck. Another term for whiplash is WAD or, Whiplash Associated Disorders. In 1995, the Quebec Task Force categorized injuries associated with whiplash by the type of tissues that were found to be injured. Here, WAD Type I represents patients with symptoms/pain but normal range of motion and no real objective findings like muscle spasm. Type II includes injuries to the soft tissues that limit neck motion with muscle spasm but no neurological loss (sensation or muscle strength). WAD Type III includes the Type II findings plus neurological loss, and type IV involves fractures of the cervical spine.

Head rest facts: Prior to the invention of head rests, whiplash injuries were much more common and more serious because the head was propelled in a “crack-the-whip” like fashion. However, headrests are frequently not adjusted correctly; they are either too low and/or too far away from the head. If the seat back is reclined, this further separates the head from the headrest. The proper position of the head rest should be near the center of gravity of the head, or about 9 cm (3.5”) below the top of the head, or at minimum, at the top of the ears. Equally important is that it should be as close as possible to the back of the head. When the distance reaches 4” away from the head, there is an increased risk of injury, especially if it’s also set too low. When the headrest is properly positioned, the chances of head injury are decreased by up to 35% during a rear-end collision.

Seat back angle. The degree of incline of the seat back can also contribute to injury of the cervical spine. As stated above, as the seat is reclined, the head to headrest distance increases, furthering the chance for injury. A second negative effect is called “ramping.” Here, the body slides up the seat back resulting in the head being positioned over the top of the head rest. Also, the degree of “spring” of the seatback contributes to the rebound of the torso during the CAD process.

Concussion: The notion that the head has to hit something to develop a concussion is not true. Also, the idea that a loss of consciousness is needed to develop a concussion is also false. Simply, the rapid forward/backward movement of the head is enough force for the brain (which is suspended by ligaments) to literally slam into the inner walls of the skull and can result in concussion. The symptoms associated with concussion are referred to as post-concussive syndrome or, mild traumatic brain injury.

We realize you have a choice in where you receive your healthcare services.  If you, a friend or family member requires care for whiplash, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services and look forward in serving you and your family presently and, in the future.

“Harder than a Half-Ironman,” Dr. Glenn’s Race Report (pic), and the 1-Page Health News (w/video)

My friend and fellow Altitude Multisport club member Justin Chester summed up Xterra Beaver Creek perfectly, “That’s harder than a Half-Ironman!” I don’t know about that since I’ve never done a Half-Ironman. But I do know this: Beaver Creek, for such a posh place, serves up one tough off-road triathlon course. For the record, I did the Sprint version.

I’m never too focused to high-five my kids at the bike-run transition!

Overall, I had a good day. My swim was slower than last year, possibly related to my lack of swim training this year. I guess I shouldn’t have taken 7 months out the pool after last season? The bike and run were about the same as last year (maybe a tad slower). Overall I was only 4 minutes off of last year’s time. I’ll take it! Next up is Xterra Indian Peaks at Eldora ski resort this coming Saturday. That’s right, 2 Saturdays in a row.

Weekly Health Update
Week of: Monday, July 22th, 2013
“A healthy outside starts from the inside.”
~ Robert Urich

Mental Attitude: Obsessed With Forbidden Pleasures.
When individuals are forbidden from everyday objects, their minds and brains pay more attention to them. Obsession is not as strong if others are also denied. When an object is forbidden to a group, the allure of the object drops dramatically. This helps to explain why group diet programs can be more successful than dieting alone.
Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, June 2013

Health Alert: Kids Poisoned.
Every 10 minutes a child in the United States is taken to the Emergency Room because of poisoning from swallowing a prescription or over-the-counter medicine. The most common drugs associated with children’s poisoning include those used to treat diabetes, high cholesterol (statins), pain (opioids), and cardiovascular diseases (beta blockers).
Pediatrics, June 2013

Diet: Soda, Illegal Drugs, and Teeth.
Drinking large quantities of soda can be as damaging to your teeth (tooth erosion) as methamphetamine and crack cocaine use. Tooth erosion occurs when acid wears away tooth enamel. Without enamel, teeth are more susceptible to developing cavities, as well as becoming sensitive, cracked, and discolored. The citric acid present in both regular and diet soda is known to have a high potential for causing tooth erosion. The ingredients used in preparing methamphetamine can include extremely corrosive materials such as battery acid, lantern fuel, and drain cleaner. Crack cocaine is also highly acidic in nature.
General Dentistry, June 2013

Exercise: Quantity Over Frequency?
A study of over 2,300 Canadian adults found that those who exercised 150 minutes over just a few days of the week received the same health benefits as those who spread out 150 minutes of exercise over the entire week.
Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, June 2013

Chiropractic: Success!
A study compared the effectiveness of manual therapy (performed by a Chiropractor), physical therapy (performed by a Physical Therapist), and medical care (delivered by a Medical Physician) for patients with neck pain. The success rate at 7 weeks was twice as high for the chiropractic therapy group (68.3%) compared to the medical care group. Patients receiving chiropractic therapy had fewer absences from work than patients receiving physical therapy or medical care for their neck pain. Manual therapy and physical therapy also resulted in statistically significant less analgesic (pain relief medication) use.
Annals of Internal Medicine, 2002

Wellness/Prevention: Prevent Stress.
Among women who reported stress, 40% had psychosomatic symptoms in the form of aches and pain in their muscles and joints, 28% suffered from headaches or migraines, and 28% reported gastrointestinal complaints. (Note- I’m sure men would have reported even more complaints, as everyone knows women are the tougher gender.)
University of Gothenburg, June 2013

As always, thanks for reading,

Common Questions about Cervical Disk Herniations

Last month, we discussed the topic of neck pain arising from cervical disk herniations. The focus of this month’s Health Update is common questions that arise from patients suffering from cervical disk derangement.

1. “What can I do to help myself for my herniated disk in my neck?” The mnemonic device “PRICE” stands for Protect, Rest, Ice Compress, and Elevate is a good tool to use in the acute stage of many musculoskeletal conditions.

  • Protect your health by NOT placing yourself in an environment that is likely to harm you, such as playing sports or doing heavy yard work. That is, think about what you do BEFORE you do it and if sharp, radiating pain occurs, STOP and assess the importance of what you are doing. Use the concept, “…don’t pick at your cut.” This means if you want the injury to heal, don’t keep irritating it!
  • Rest is similar. Limit your activities to those that can be done without increasing symptoms, especially radiating pain.
  • Ice – The use of ice reduces swelling/inflammation, which reduces pain and promotes healing. Alternate it every 15-20 minutes (on/off/on/off/on) several times a day. You can also use contrast therapy (Ice/heat/ice/heat/ice) at 10/5/10/5/10 minute intervals to “pump” out the swelling.
  • Compress – The use of a collar worn backwards, if it’s more comfortable that way, can literally “take the load off.” the neck and disks. There are even inflatable collars which are pumped up with air to traction the neck. Other forms of traction will be discussed further.
  • Elevate – The concept of raising the ankle to the height of the heart so swelling can drain out of the ankle is the classic example of “elevation.” In the neck, the traction concept may apply once again.

2. “I don’t want to have surgery if I can help it. What can you do as a chiropractor to help me?” This is one of our primary goals, and in fact, the goal of ALL health care providers, even surgeons! Chiropractic offers anti-inflammatory measures: ice, herbal anti-inflammatory agents (ginger, turmeric, bioflavonoid, curcumin, bromelain, Rosemary extract, Boswellia Extract, and more), digestive enzymes taken between meals, muscle relaxant nutrients (valerian root, vitamin D, a B complex, chamomile, magnesium, and others) as well as other non-pharmaceutical options. Treatments consist of manual manipulation, mobilization, traction (for home and office), modalities such as laser and low-level laser, electrical stimulation, magnetic field, ultrasound, and others.

Most important is having a “coach” guide you through the stages of healing by first addressing the acute inflammatory stage (first 72 hrs), the proliferative or reparative phase (up to 6-8 weeks), followed by the remodeling phase (8 weeks to 1 or 2 years) and finally, the contraction phase (lifetime – includes the natural shortening of scar tissue). If manual traction reduces neck and arm pain, the use of home traction is very effective. Options include sitting over-the-door traction, laying down versions, and mobile traction collars (discussed previously).

Exercises to stretch and strengthen the neck are also very important in reducing neck pain as well as preventing recurrences. If in spite of all the best efforts of this non-surgical care approach should ongoing neurological loss and relentless symptoms continue, we will coordinate care with physiatrists for possible injection therapy and pharmaceuticals, with neurology for further testing (such as EMG/NCV – a nerve test), and/or neuro- or orthopedic surgery – THE LAST RESORT!

We realize that you have a choice in where you receive your healthcare services.  If you, a friend or family member requires care for neck pain, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services and look forward in serving you and your family presently and, in the future. 303.300.0424 [email protected]

 

What a week (pic), open your chest (video) and this week’s 1-Page Health News.

Denverback.com home.

After a week of fun with my family up in Beaver Creek, I’m back in the office rested and ready for work. I hope all of you had a great 4th. For those of you who are wondering, no, I did not see the bear again this year. Yes, I rode the Xterra Beaver Creek bike course 4 times, breaking my chain on the last day. I had to hike out and coast down through the streets of Bachelor Gulch to get back to the hotel. Here’s a pic of my kids up in the village in one of the rare moments when they weren’t fighting. Kidding. Sort of.

Weekly Health Update
Week of: Monday, July 8th, 2013

“Healthy citizens are the greatest asset any country can have.”
~ Winston Churchill
.
Mental Attitude: The First Three Years and Aggression.
Children who witnessed domestic violence before age three were more likely to show aggression when they reached grade school, even if they were removed from their home and witnessed no domestic violence in the interim. According to Dr. Megan Holmes, the study’s lead author, “[This] gives social workers a window of opportunity between ages 3 and 5 to help the children socialize and learn what is appropriate behavior.”
Psychology and Psychiatry, March 2013

Health Alert: Alarming Cancer Rates
By 2020, nearly 47% of people will get cancer in their lifetime, but almost 38% will survive the disease. One reason more people are getting cancer is because we are living longer and the incident rate of cancer increases with an aging population. The reduction in the number of people dying of cancer is because more cases are diagnosed earlier and treatments and care are improving.
Macmillan Cancer Support, June 2013

Diet: TV Exposure?
More time in front of the TV set and higher exposure to TV ads leads to increased consumption of sweetened beverages among children. Each additional hour in front of the TV increased the likelihood of regular sweetened beverage consumption by 50%. Only one parent in seven indicated that they tried to reduce their children’s exposure to TV ads. The same parents stated that their children were less prone to drink soft drinks and other sweetened beverages. Children of parents who were less strict about TV ads were twice as likely to consume sweetened beverages every week.
University of Gothenburg, Sweden, June 2013

Exercise: Soccer and Diabetes.
After three months of soccer training, the hearts of diabetic men appeared to be 10 years “younger”. On average, soccer training reduced the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg. Maximal oxygen uptake was increased by 12% and that their intermittent exercise capacity was elevated by 42%.
University of Copenhagen, June 2013

Chiropractic: No Headaches
Cervical spine manipulation was associated with significant improvement in reducing headache symptoms involving patients with neck pain and/or neck dysfunction and headache.
Duke Evidence Report, 2001

Wellness/Prevention: Phones Not So Smart.
Smartphones and tablets can disturb sleep. The cause is due to the bright light-emitting diodes that can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that controls the natural sleep-wake cycle. Dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches (~.36m) from your face while using it will reduce these negative effects.
Mayo Clinic, June 2013

As always, thanks for reading,

Denver Chiropractic Center – Dr. Glenn Hyman, Dr. Jeff Stripling, Erin Young LMT & Natalie Aceves, office manager. Denverback.com home.

Car Accidents and neck pain (a.k.a. Whiplash)

Whiplash refers to an injury to the neck resulting from a rapid movement, usually associated with a motor vehicle collision (MVC). However, it can occur with a slip and fall injury, a bar room brawl, during a sports event like being tackled in football, among other things. For the sake of this discussion, we will stick with the classic example of a rear-end MVC.

 Mechanism of injury: So what really happens during the MVC that causes injury? The answer centers around movement of the neck which exceeds the normal tissue’s stretch limits, sometimes referred to as “the elastic barrier.” When the MVC occurs, during the first 100-200 milliseconds the trunk supported by the back of the car seat rapidly moves forwards leaving the head unprotected in its original position resulting in a backward glide or motion of the head and neck. Next, the head (which weighs about 12-15 pounds) drops back (HOPEFULLY) into the headrest stopping the motion, but if the head rest is too far back (>1/2 inch) or too low, then the head keeps going backwards until the tissues in the front of the neck stretch to the point of either stopping the motion or tearing (or both).

Next, the highly stretched front of the neck muscles, ligaments, disks, and tendons (in a “crack the whip” like manner) propel the head forwards to the point of over stretching the tissues in the back of the neck, which similarly stops the movement &/or tears. The degree of injury depends on many things, but is notably worse in the long-necked, skinny female where the “crack the whip” reaction is the greatest. Several factors determine the degree of injury, including the “G-Force,” or the amount of energy produced during the impact. The greater the G-force applied to the head/neck, the greater the potential for injury.

The G-force affecting the occupants inside the vehicle is related to many things: the speed of the crash, the size of the two vehicles (worse if a large automobile hits your smaller car), the angle and springiness of the seat back, the amount of energy absorbed by crushing metal vs. no damage to the vehicles (worse when there is no damage as all the energy is transfer to the occupants), whether the head was rotated or looking straight at impact, and more. The KEY to all of this is that we cannot voluntarily contract our muscles quicker than 800-1000 msec and the whiplash process is over after about 500 msec, so we can’t effectively “guard” or protect ourselves against injury even if we try by bracing ourselves before the MVC!

            Type of injury: The classic injury is called a sprain (ligament tear) and strain (muscle and/or muscle tendon tear) to either or both the front of the neck and/or back of the neck. Sprains and strains come in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree tears, getting progressively worse as more tissue is torn. Please refer to previous issues of the Whiplash Health Update where the anatomy is reviewed so you can “picture” this properly.

            Prognosis: The length of time to recovery or maximum improvement varies by the amount of tissue damage. A “prognosis scale,” first introduced in 1995 and validated by 2001, showed that in Type 1 injuries pain without loss of neck motion healed the quickest. Type 2 injuries where neck movement was reduced after the MVC (but no neurological findings occurred) healed next quickest. Type 3 injuries, which included BOTH motion and neurological loss, healed the slowest and had the worst long-term outcomes. Other factors enter into this, of course.

We will continue this “Whiplash 101” discussion next month…

We realize you have a choice in where you receive your healthcare services.  If you, a friend or family member requires care for whiplash, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services and look forward in serving you and your family presently and, in the future.

Our most watched video ever: Dr. Glenn & the bear, 4th of July week, and the 1-Page Health News

It was last year, 4th of July week up at Beaver Creek when I, Dr. Glenn Hyman, encountered my first bear. Having grown up in New Jersey it was a big deal to me. The video I shared reigns as our most watched video ever, and the link is below. The panicky guy who sounds an awful lot like me was some other person.

Next week, I’ll be back up in Beaver Creek for 4th of July week. This will be my second annual personal Xterra Beaver Creek training camp. If you’re up in the Vail / Beaver Creek area and want to ride the course next week, shoot me an email.

If you need to get in to see me here at Denver Chiropractic Center, call today 303.300.0424. I’m in all this week and out all next week.

Dr. Stripling will be in next Monday and Tuesday, and half of Wednesday before we close for the long 4th of July weekend.

Here is the 1-Page Health News:

Mental Health: Depression and Stroke Risk in Middle-Aged Women.
A 12-year study of over 10,000 middle-aged Australian women found that those who suffered from depression had nearly double the risk of stroke compared to non-depressed women in their same age group. The American Heart Association encourages everyone to learn how to recognize a stroke. Think F.A.S.T: F-Face Drooping. A-Arm Weakness. S-Speech Difficulty. T-Time To Call 9-1-1 (or the appropriate emergency services number if you’re outside the United States).
American Heart Association, May 2013

Diet: Brain Rewards.
Restricting food intake increases the reward value of food, particularly high-calorie and appetizing food. The more successful people are at caloric-restriction dieting, the greater difficulty they will face in maintaining the restriction. Dieting by skipping meals and fasting is less successful than weight loss efforts characterized by intake of low energy, dense, healthy foods. If people want to lose excess weight, it would be more effective to consume healthy, low-sugar foods during regular meals, rather than go for long periods of time without eating.
NeuroImage, May 2013

Exercise: It’s Not Too Late To Cut Heart Failure Risk!
In an eight year study, middle-aged participants drastically reduced their risk of heart failure up to 40% by increasing their cardiovascular fitness level.
American Heart Association, May 2013

Chiropractic: No Headaches!
Spinal manipulative therapy (aka adjustments) is an effective treatment for tension headaches. In a study, patients who received adjustments continued to benefit from care even four weeks after treatment concluded. This is in contrast to patients who received pharmaceutical therapy; they reverted to baseline values when checked a month after treatment ended.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 1995

Wellness/Prevention: Fish Oil, Your Heart, and Stress.
A new study finds that regular consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids (most commonly found in cold water fish like Salmon) improves cardiovascular health by dulling the connection between mentally stressful events and cardiovascular functions like heart rate, blood pressure, the fight-or-flight response, and blood flow. Those who frequently find themselves in stressful situations may benefit from adding Omega-3s to their diet.
American Physiological Society, May 2013
Video link: Dr. Glenn and the bear!