Tag: Denver Back pain

Filling up fast

We have 2 appointments open today (9/21) and are completely full tomorrow (9/22). So if you want to / need to come see us, don’t delay- call today. 303.300.0424 or reply to this email and we will get you scheduled.

We can help you with:


Back pain
Neck pain
Headaches
Sciatica
Hips
Shoulders
Knees, ankles elbows & hands

All you need to do is call (or reply to this email)
303.300.0424.

Why wait?

Why waste another week in pain? Come see our Denver Chiropractor

“I waited too long to come in.”

That’s the #1 thing we hear from patients when they come to see us. It’s human nature to wait for pain to go away. Sometimes it does, but sometimes it doesn’t. Why waste time in pain? If something is hurting, call us and we will get you in. 303.300.0424. Back pain, neck pain, headaches, shoulder problems, hip pain, sciatica and more. Our Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman is here with chiropractic care and Active Release Techniques when you need help.

Denver Chiropractor is here to help…

It sure was a night of fun at the Rockies game this past Saturday night for my middle son Jason and I. Star Wars bobble heads, both benches cleared after Carlos Gonzales almost got plunked, and the Rockies won 7-3. But man do those seats bug my back. If you did something that bugged your back (or neck, or shoulder, or hip…you get the idea) call us at 303.300.0424 to get to the desk. We will get you in. Don’t waste time with pain.

No broken ankle will stop me from coaching kids’ sports. The 7-8 Minor League Muck Dogs won their game 9-2 this past Saturday. My 7-year-old Zach played 3rd base and had 2 hits.

We’re out this Friday, so if you need to come see us don’t wait. Call 303.300.0424 or email office@denverback.com to get straight to Meaghan at the desk!

 

This week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Sleep Helps Memory.
If you want to give your memory a boost, make sure to get enough sleep. The National Sleep Foundation says that sleep benefits your memory the following ways: it helps your body retain what you’ve learned, it fosters new neuron connections that transform experiences into long-term memories, and it enhances your ability to stay focused when studying unfamiliar material.
National Sleep Foundation, May 2017

Health Alert: Any Level of Smoking Promotes Heart Risks.
You may think that having an occasional cigarette in a social setting is less harmful for your heart than smoking a pack a day, but a new study suggests otherwise. Researchers reviewed health data concerning nearly 40,000 people in the United States and found that both social smokers and regular smokers have double the risk for hypertension and more than a 50% greater risk for high cholesterol—both of which are major contributors to cardiovascular disease—when compared with nonsmokers.
American Journal of Health Promotion, May 2017

Diet: Yogurt Consumption Linked to Better Bone Health Among Senior Women.
A large observational study of dairy intake and bone and frailty measurements among older adult females has found that increased yogurt consumption is associated with a higher hip bone density and a significantly reduced risk of osteoporosis. Lead author Dr. Eamon Laird notes, “Yogurt is a rich source of different bone promoting nutrients and thus our findings in some ways are not surprising. The data suggest that improving yogurt intakes could be a strategy for maintaining bone health but it needs verification through future research as it is observational.”
Osteoporosis International, May 2017

Exercise: Cardiorespiratory Fitness Reduces the Risk of Fatty Liver.
When too much fat is present in the liver, it can hinder the organ’s ability to heal itself and filter toxins from the body. A new study finds that cardiorespiratory fitness is inversely related to the risk of fat build up in the liver. Researchers measured the cardiorespiratory fitness of 463 people using a cycle ergometer exercise test and determined fatty liver with the use of ultrasound. The researchers found that individuals with greater cardiorespiratory fitness were less likely to have a fatty liver, even after controlling for factors such as smoking, alcohol use, serum lipids, insulin, glucose, and C-reactive protein.
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, May 2017

Chiropractic: Musculoskeletal Risk Factors for Back Pain.
A recent research review set out to identify musculoskeletal risk factors that can be treated clinically before the onset of lower back pain (LBP). Investigators found twelve articles that evaluated musculoskeletal risk factors for the development of lower back pain, which included a total of 5,459 participants. The researchers found a link between an increased risk of developing LBP and restriction in side bending in the low back, restriction of hamstring range of motion, and limited lumbar lordosis. These findings may allow clinicians to screen for and identify risk factors that could potentially reduce costs and improve the quality of life of many individuals by preventing the development of back pain.
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017

Wellness/Prevention: Keeping Teens Safe in the Sun.
Teens often enjoy the sun without worrying about wrinkles, sun damage, or skin cancer, but experts say that parents should have a conversation with their children about staying safe while outdoors during the warmer months. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the following for teens: stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun rays are at their strongest; wear light clothing with tightly-woven fabric that can reflect sun’s rays; wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses; apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen every day before going outdoors, and reapply it throughout the day; make sure it’s applied to the entire body, including the tops of the ears and feet; regularly check skin for moles that look suspicious, and point any out to a parent or doctor.
American Academy of Pediatrics, May 2017

Just 2 appointments left for this week (both today 5/11), Rockies pic and tix

Before we get started I want to wish all the moms out there a happy Mother’s Day this Sunday!

We have just 2 spots left today 5/11, and I am out tomorrow Friday 5/12 (the kids have Field Day Friday, if it ever stops raining:).

Call us at 303.300.0424 asap to get in before the weekend. Or reply to this email to get straight to Meg at the desk.



Here’s a pic of my son Jason and I waiting out the rain delay before yesterday’s Rockies – Cubs game. After the delay we had a great time watching the Rockies beat the Cubs 3-0.

Email subscribers: We have 2 Rockies-Dodgers tickets to give away for Saturday night (5/12)! So check your email and reply with, “I want Rockies Tickets,” and the best phone number to call you at, and Meg will enter you into the random drawing

(2/27/2017) Short Week Alert and win Rockies tickets

Short Week Alert. We will have a short week this week in our office, so if you need to get in this week please don’t hesitate to call 303.300.0424 ASAP or reply to this email.

 

Monday 2/27: In the office

Tuesday 2/28: In the office

Weds 3/1: In the office

Thursday 3/2: Out of the office

Friday 3/3: Out of the office

 

Coming soon- Win Rockies Tickets!Yep, the Avs ticket giveaways have been so popular that I got Rockies tickets to keep the party going all summer long. Just keep watching for our emails!

 

Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News.

 
Concussions May Accelerate Alzheimer’s.
A new study suggests concussions may speed up mental decline among individuals already at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, researchers examined 160 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and found that concussions seemed to accelerate Alzheimer’s disease-related brain deterioration and mental decline in the veterans at genetic risk for the disease. Dr. Jasmeet Hayes, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine writes, “Our results suggest that when combined with genetic factors, concussions may be associated with accelerated cortical thickness and memory decline in Alzheimer’s disease-relevant areas.”
Brain, January 2017

Diet: Eating Rare Meat Safely.
If you prefer your meat cooked rare versus well done, it is important that it is prepared safely. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests: use a food thermometer to make sure rare meat is hot enough to destroy any germs; avoid using the color of meat, the color of juices, or the firmness of meat to determine if it’s sufficiently cooked; cook ground lamb, pork, veal, or beef to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit (71.11 degrees Celsius) at its center; and cook steak to 145 degrees Fahrenheit (62.77 degrees Celsius) at its center.
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, January 2017

Exercise: Set a Health Goal That Lasts.
Did you make a New Year’s resolution to become healthier? The American Council on Exercise offers the following tips to help one continue to strive towards their goal as the year progresses: set a small, specific, actionable goal, such as going for a walk every other day; view your goal as a positive change that you want to see in yourself; don’t make your goal so challenging that you are likely to get frustrated; reward yourself for meeting the goal; and ask for support from family, friends, and loved ones.
American Council on Exercise, January 2017

Chiropractic: Surgery No More Effective Than Conservative Care for Disk Herniations in the Long-Term.
A recent study sought to compare the effectiveness of surgical and conservative treatment for patients with a lumbar disk herniation in regards to sciatica symptom severity and quality of life. Researchers followed 370 lumbar disk herniation patients for 104 weeks and found that surgical treatment did not show a benefit over conservative treatment during long-term follow-up. The findings suggest that conservative care has the same long-term effects as surgery for lumbar disk herniation but with less cost and associated risk.
BMJ Open, December 2016

Wellness/Prevention: How to Avoid Feeling Tired.
If you’re not getting enough sleep and feel groggy when you wake up, you don’t need to turn to caffeine to stay awake. The National Sleep Foundation recommends the following to feel more alert: avoid alcohol before bed; set a sleep schedule, waking and going to sleep at the same time every day—even on weekends; set your alarm for the time you truly need to wake up; open the curtains to let in natural sunlight as soon as you wake; exercise daily; and eat a nutritious and balanced breakfast.
National Sleep Foundation, January 2017

Feb 23, 2017: 2 Spots Left this week:

2 Spots Left this week: We have just 2 spots open this week, 1 today (Feb 23) and 1 tomorrow (Feb 24). So if you want to get in this week please call asap 303.300.0424 or reply to this email.

Short week next week: Next week is a short week for us as I’ll be out on Thursday and Friday, March 2 and 3. Next week is filling up fast so please on our schedule before it is full.

Back in the office Feb 13, 2017

After taking a few days off last week to help my wife through her ACL (knee) reconstruction surgery – it went very well – I am back in the office today. Thanks for your patience. We have just one spot open today so if you need us, please call asap 303.300.0424.

Feb 6, 2017- Short week alert

I’ll be in just Monday-Wednesday this week as I’m taking Thursday and Friday off for my wife’s ACL reconstruction surgery. So call us ASAP if you want to see us. 303.300.0424

Who would you call? And This Week’s 1-Page Health News.

By now most of you who read these posts know that my wife blew out her ACL a couple of weeks ago and is having knee surgery soon to reconstruct it. But there’s a part of the story I haven’t shared yet.

When she went down on the slopes of Winter Park, I had a wife yelling in pain, 3 kids kind of freaking out, and I had no idea how to get a hold of the ski patrol. I sat there kind of dumbly watching other skiers and boarders going by hoping that maybe a ski school instructor would appear.

Luckily a good Samaritan stopped and had the ski patrol phone number on a laminated piece of paper in his pocket. I called from my phone and they were there in minutes. 

The moral of the story- know the number for the ski patrol where you are skiing or riding. We’re in the process of putting a card together for you all with the popular ski resorts’ patrol numbers on it. (Winter Park’s is 970.726.1480.)

 

Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News.

 

Diet: Are Low-Carb Diets Better for Weight Loss Than Low-Fat Diets?
Physicians at Mayo Clinic say that low-carb diets are slightly better than low-fat diets for weight loss, at least in the short term. An analysis of 41 trials that evaluated the effects of low-carb diets on weight loss showed that participants lost between 2.5-9 more pounds (1.13-4.08 kg) than those who followed a low-fat diet. Lead researcher Dr. Heather Fields adds, “The best conclusion to draw is that adhering to a short-term low-carb diet appears to be safe and may be associated with weight reduction.” However, she recommends that people who follow a low-carb diet should avoid highly processed foods, especially processed meats, such as bacon, sausage, deli meats, hot dogs, and ham.
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, December 2016

Exercise: Serious Yoga Injuries Are on the Rise, But Rare.
Yoga has become increasingly more popular in recent years and so have yoga-related injuries. According to a new report, nearly 30,000 Americans visited the emergency room for yoga-related sprains, fractures, or other injuries between 2001 and 2014. Despite rising injuries, experts say that overall, yoga appears relatively safe. They add that the potential gains from performing yoga, such as lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol, lower heart rate, and improvements in depression, anxiety, and sleep problems outweigh the risk of injury. Dr. Joshua Harris from the Houston Methodist Hospital comments, “My advice to people is to start slow, don’t push too hard, and find a good instructor who emphasizes proper form and technique.”
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, December 2016

Chiropractic: You Can’t Blame Acute Low Back Pain on the Weather.
A recent study investigated the influence of various weather parameters on the risk of developing an episode of low back pain. Among a group of 981 patients with an acute episode of low back pain, researchers found that precipitation, humidity, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, and air pressure did not increase the risk of onset for acute low back pain.
Pain Medicine, December 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Depression Hurts Smoking Cessation Efforts.
An analysis of data from a Czech smoking cessation clinic reveals that smokers with depression have a harder time quitting. The study included 3,775 patients and found that those with mild depression were 32% less likely to abstain from smoking for one year than those without depressive symptoms, while patients with severe depression were 43% less likely to quit.
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, December 2016