Category: Jaw Pain

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman Presents Denver Chiropractic Center’s 1-Page Health News

Mental Attitude: Chronic Stress Can Affect Memory.
Individuals subjected to chronic stress due to bullying or a tough job may experience problems with their memory. Researchers found that mice who were repeatedly stressed by larger, more aggressive mice when they tried to find an escape hole in a maze became more forgetful than mice not exposed to the aggressive mice. The researchers say that the mice’s inability to remember coincided with stress-induced inflammation in the brain. They hope that a better understanding of stress, cognition, and mood problems may help create strategies for those suffering from anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Journal of Neuroscience, March 2016

Health Alert: Secondhand Smoke Exacerbates COPD Symptoms.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that makes breathing difficult and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. A recent study found 20% of COPD patients live with an active smoker and 27% were exposed to secondhand smoke during the previous week. For the COPD patient, secondhand smoke exposure is linked to a greater risk for severe exacerbations (51%), nocturnal symptoms (58%), wheezing (34%), and chronic cough (77%).
Thorax, March 2016

Diet: High-Fat Diet May Raise Cancer Risk.
New research suggests that a high-fat diet could increase the risk of colon cancer. In this study, researchers fed healthy mice a high-fat diet (60% of total calories from fat) for nine months and found the mice gained 30-50% more body mass and developed more intestinal tumors than mice on a control diet.
Nature, March 2016

Exercise: Brain Chemicals Affected By Exercise.
Researchers have found that people who exercise not only have better physical fitness than inactive persons, but they also have better mental fitness. Using MRI scans, researchers found that intense exercise increased the levels of two common neurotransmitters called glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid in study participants. The finding offers insights into brain metabolism and how exercise could become an essential part of treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders associated with deficiencies in neurotransmitters. Lead researcher Dr. Richard Maddock adds, “We are offering another view on why regular physical activity may be important to prevent or treat depression… Not every depressed person who exercises will improve, but many will. It’s possible that we can help identify the patients who would most benefit from an exercise prescription.”
Journal of Neuroscience, February 2016

Chiropractic: Is it CTS or Double Crush Syndrome?
Many patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may also have median nerve entrapments further up the course of the nerve (in the neck, shoulder, elbow, etc). When the median nerve is encumbered at two anatomical locations, it’s described as a double crush syndrome (DCS). In this study, researchers compared the results of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) tests on patients with CTS and patients with CTS and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (an example of DCS). The results showed worse nerve function in the patients with DCS, supporting the possibility of more severe CTS symptoms with a lower likelihood of resolution if treatment only focused on the wrist.
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association, September 2015 (Note- we treat both of these conditions with a combination of Active Release Techniques (ART) and chiropractic work. Call us at 303.300.0424)

Wellness/Prevention: Experts Unsure If Seniors Should Have Routine Vision Checks.
A panel of experts concludes there is not enough data to say whether or not seniors should be routinely screened for vision trouble by their primary care physicians. According to the panel, primary care doctors typically check vision with an eye chart test and while this test can detect refractive errors, it does not identify early stage age-related macular degeneration or cataracts. Task force member Dr. Michael Pignone notes, “Older adults who are having vision problems should talk to their primary care doctor or eye specialist… in the absence of clear evidence, primary care doctors should use their clinical judgment when deciding whether to screen for vision problems in patients without vision symptoms.”
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, March 2016

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center and this week’s 1-Page Health News

We are in the very final stages of our office remodel, and I’m happy to say that all of our treatment rooms are open again. During the construction, there were a few weeks where we had just one treatment room, and that’s why it was tough for some of you to get in to see us. We are truly sorry about the inconvenience, but we are fully operational once again! So if you need us, call us 303.300.0424 (or reply to this email to get straight to Natalie at front desk.)

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Your Speaking Skills May Be the Key to Making Things Happen.
Investigators at the University of Chicago report that your voice may be instrumental in advancing your career. In the study, researchers found that evaluators were more moved to action by well-spoken pitches than well-written submissions.
Journal of Psychological Science, February 2015

Health Alert: New Data on E-Cigarette Use Among College Students.
Surveys completed by nearly 1,400 college students show that 30% have at least tried e-cigarettes. Among current e-cigarette users, 87% previously used another nicotine product and nearly 35% used other non-cigarette tobacco products during the previous month. The data also show that students who use e-cigarettes tend to have average or below-average grades.
Drug and Alcohol Dependence, April 2015

Diet: Salt Intake May Affect More Than Your Blood Pressure.
A new study warns that eating too much salt may damage your blood vessels, heart, kidneys, and brain, even if you don’t develop high blood pressure. Researchers say that even if people do not develop high blood pressure, excessive salt consumption can lead to reduced function of the inner lining of blood vessels, enlargement of the left ventricle of the heart, kidney function issues, and damage to the sympathetic nervous system.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, March 2015

Exercise: Can Exercise Improve Your Child’s Math Grades?
After performing physical fitness tests on 273 elementary school students, Indian researchers found that those with the greatest levels of aerobic fitness scored 8-11% higher on math tests than their least fit peers, even after adjusting for gender, socioeconomic status, and weight status. Because physical fitness could elevate a student’s grade from a C to a B or a B to an A, the researchers recommend educators and policymakers look for opportunities to promote physical activity during the school day.
PLOS ONE, March 2015

Chiropractic: Sitting Increases Back Pain Risk?
While most people think of back pain as resulting from strenuous physical activity, a new study finds that the more time an individual spends sitting each day at both home and work, the greater their risk for a back injury. In the study, researchers found that among a group of 201 blue-collar workers, those who spent the most time sitting on their average day were three times more likely to experience back pain when compared with those who sit the fewest hours on a given day.
PLOS ONE, March 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Insufficient Sleep Linked to Overnight Increases in Blood Pressure.
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that individuals who don’t sleep enough hours experience a rise in blood pressure and an elevated heart rate when they do sleep, the opposite of what occurs in those who get sufficient quality sleep. Researcher Dr. Naima Covassin explains, “We know high blood pressure, particularly during the night, is one of the major risk factors for heart disease, and Americans typically do not get enough sleep. For the first time, we demonstrated that insufficient sleep causes increases in nighttime blood pressure and dampens nocturnal blood pressure dipping by using a controlled study that mimics the sleep loss experienced by many people.”
Mayo Clinic, March 2015

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center

If you see this dog, please don’t approach her. & This Week’s 1-Page Health News

This is Liberty. Liberty is a puppy who is training to be a guide dog for the blind. One of our awesome patients, Karen B., is training and socializing Liberty for a year. If you’re coming to our office in the afternoon, you may encounter this super-cute dog. Since she’s working, it’s best for Liberty if you admire her from afar please refrain from approaching her. By doing so, you’ll be contributing a little tiny bit to Liberty’s training.
IMG_0047
This Week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Misfiring in Brain Linked to OCD.
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have found that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may be caused by a misfiring of the brain’s control system. Individuals with OCD have frequent upsetting thoughts that they try to control by repeating certain rituals or behaviors. The study involved scanning the brains of 37 individuals with OCD and the brains of 33 individuals who did not have the disorder as they all performed a specific activity to avoid a mild electric shock. The researchers found that OCD participants were unable to stop the specific activity, which revealed overactive brain activity in the caudate (an area of the brain that controls habits) and suggests OCD compulsions may be caused by the habit system in the brain.
American Journal of Psychiatry, December 2014

Diet: Cherry Juice Accelerates Recovery After Cycling.
Montmorency cherry juice appears to help cyclists recover after a hard cycling workout. Researchers found that Montmorency tart cherry juice helped to speed up recovery, maintain muscle function, and reduce markers of inflammation in cyclists who participated in a simulated race.
Cherry Marketing Institute, December 2014

Exercise: Ability to Balance May Reflect Brain Health.
According to new research, the inability to balance on one leg for 20 seconds or longer may signal brain damage in otherwise healthy individuals. In a recent study, participants were asked to balance on one leg up to 60 seconds, received an MRI of the brain, and completed a test to measure cognitive impairment. Those who were unable to balance on one leg for more than 20 seconds showed evidence of cerebral small vessel disease as well as lower cognitive function scores. The researchers add that long-term studies are needed to verify these findings and fully assess the significance of postural instability.
Stroke, December 2014

Chiropractic: Neck, Shoulder, and Back Pain Among High School Students.
Chinese researchers evaluated questionnaires completed by 3,600 high school students and found that 41.1% had experienced neck/shoulder pain and 32.8% had experienced back pain during the previous year. The researchers identified physical inactivity (increased sedentary behavior / low levels of physical exercise), heavy backpacks, mental stress, and insufficient sleep as risk factors for neck, shoulder, and back pain in the high school student population.
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association, October 2014

Wellness/Prevention: Young Children Need Eye Screening.
Experts from the United States National Center for Children’s Vision Health say that all children should have their eyesight evaluated yearly between the ages of three and six. Children in this age group require screening to detect vision issues such as amblyopia (“lazy eye”) and strabismus (a disorder of eye alignment), which can require glasses. Dr. Anthony Adams, the editor-in-chief of the journal Optometry and Vision Science, adds, “Unfortunately, many children receive neither appropriate screening to help identify those who need immediate eye attention, nor a comprehensive examination by an eye care professional, prior to beginning school.” The goal of the new guidelines is to ensure that pre-school children with vision problems are identified and receive appropriate eye examinations and follow-up care to help ensure their development and readiness for elementary school.
Optometry and Vision Science, December 2014

Chiropractic: Whiplash May Cause or Aggravate Jaw Pain.

A review of 129 studies on temporomandibular disorders (TMD) found that TMD patients are three-times more likely to have experienced whiplash trauma. TMD patients who also suffered head-neck trauma reported more TMD-related jaw pain, headaches, and stress symptoms. According to the authors of the review article, “These results suggest that whiplash trauma might be an initiating and/or aggravating factor as well as a co-morbid condition for TMD.”
Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, January 2014