Month: January 2016

Denver Chiropractic Center (Dr. Glenn Hyman, chiropractor): This Week’s One-Page Health News.

Denver Chiropractic Center (Dr. Glenn Hyman): This Week’s One-Page Health News.

Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Sense of Purpose in Life May Boost Longevity and Heart Health.
New research suggests that having a sense of purpose might protect your heart and add years to your life. Scientists analyzed studies involving 136,000 individuals and found that those who felt strongly that their lives had meaning or that they were “useful” to others had a lower risk for heart disease and premature death than those whose lives felt less meaningful. Co-author Dr. Alan Rozanski writes, “The current findings are important because they may open up new potential interventions for helping people to promote their health and sense of well-being.”
Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, December 2015

Health Alert: The World Appears to Be a Safer Place.
Since 1990, there has been a significant declining trend in the rates of death and disability due to injury. The reduction in injuries can be taken as good news, but 4.8 million deaths globally in 2013 is still a large number, and efforts to reduce death and disability from injury worldwide must continue.
Injury Prevention, December 2015

Diet: Diets Are Becoming Sweeter.
Investigators analyzed global nutrition and discovered that sales of sugar-sweetened drinks are rising around the world in terms of calories sold per person per day, as well as volume sold per person per day. This finding is concerning for researchers as it is well known that greater added sugar intake can increase an individual’s risk for obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, December 2015

Exercise: Does Physical Activity Reduce Cardiovascular Risks in Seniors?
Though guidelines suggest the cardiovascular systems of those over 75 years old would benefit from regular physical activity, few studies have actually evaluated this relationship. Using ten years of data collected from 4,207 men and women, researchers found the more physically active the participant, the lower their risk for a heart attack or stroke. In one example cited by the authors of the study, the risks for heart attack and stroke were essentially cut in half among those who habitually walked at a 3 mph (~4.82 kmh) pace when compared with those who normally walked at a 2 mph (~3.21 kmh) pace.
Circulation, November 2015

Chiropractic: Diabetics More Likely to Have Musculoskeletal Pain.
Taiwanese researchers reviewed records concerning nearly 40,000 patients and found that young adults with type 2 diabetes were nearly 40% more likely than non-diabetics to experience musculoskeletal (MSK) pain during a ten-year time period. The most common causes for MSK-related doctor visits among diabetic patients were associated with lower back pain, pelvic pain, and pain in the limbs. Previous research had shown poor blood sugar control can lead to damage to the bones and nerves, which can increase a diabetic’s risk for musculoskeletal pain, particularly in the limbs. Additionally, other studies have found an association between the development of lower back pain (LBP) and reduced physical activity, high body-mass index, and a sedentary lifestyle, all of which are common among type 2 diabetics.
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Smoking and Poor Nutrition Affect Fertility.
For couples having difficulty getting pregnant, eating more fruits and vegetables along with not smoking may be good advice. Researchers followed the weekly activities of couples undergoing fertility treatment and found male smoking increased the risk of pregnancy loss, female smoking caused an adverse effect on ovarian reserve, and eating more servings of fruits and vegetables was associated with a greater likelihood of fertilization.
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, December 2015

As always, thanks for reading!

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center
303.300.0424

Denver Chiropractor Glenn Hyman at Denver Chiropractic Center is in today.

For all you teachers, students, and government employees out there, we are open today – Martin Luther King Day. And of course we are open for all the rest of you too! Just call us at 303.300.0424 or reply to this email and we will get you in today.
Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News:
Mental Attitude: No Biological Differences Between Male and Female Brains.
The evaluation of more than 1,400 MRI scans suggests that biologically unmistakable sex differences don’t extend to the structure of the brain. Though the brain is home to a mix of masculine and feminine characteristics, researchers found the brains of males and females tend not to stand apart in terms of gray matter, white matter, or connections inside the brain. Lead author Dr. Daphna Joel writes, “Our results undermine the entire concept of boy/girl brains.”
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, November 2015

Health Alert: Coal Burning Pollution Very Damaging to Health.
Using data gathered from 450,000 people in the United States, investigators found that particles from burning coal contribute five times more to the risk of death from heart disease than other air pollution particles of the same size. According to the World Health Organization, air pollution kills approximately three million people worldwide each year. The authors of the analysis write that coal emissions are a major factor in this public health crisis, and these emissions must be reduced to lower the number of deaths caused by air pollution.
Environmental Health Perspectives, December 2015

Diet: Caffeinated Energy Drinks May Raise Teens’ Diabetes Risk.
Highly caffeinated “energy shots” appear to trigger short-term insulin resistance in teens. In a recent study, researchers observed that teens who drank a highly caffeinated energy shot experienced a 25% increase in both blood sugar and insulin levels that was not observed when they consumed a decaffeinated version. Researchers speculate that the high dose of caffeine might directly interfere with insulin’s ability to control sugar levels, or it might hamper the function of insulin by promoting the release of hormones, like adrenaline, that work counter to insulin.
World Diabetes Congress, December 2015

Exercise: Reduces Age-Related Arterial Stiffening!
The hardening or stiffening of the arteries can increase an individual’s risk for cardiac events like a heart attack or stroke. Among a sample of 470 healthy adults, those with the highest cardiorespiratory fitness levels over a period of two years experienced less arterial stiffening than those who exercised the least. This finding adds to the large body of research that associates physical fitness with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease.
Journal of Clinical Hypertension, December 2015

Chiropractic: Head Posture and Muscle Endurance Associated with Neck Pain in Teens.
Portuguese researchers analyzed the posture and neck muscle function of 35 teens with neck pain and 35 of their asymptomatic peers. They found a distinct difference in cervical posture between the two groups and also detected less neck flexor and extensor endurance among the teens with neck pain.
Manual Therapy, October 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Keep Safe While on the Road.
When traveling in your car, whether it’s for your daily commute or a long trip, it’s important to protect yourself. The American Red Cross recommends: never drive when impaired, use your seatbelt, make sure to stay alert and are well-rested, never use cell phone while driving, pay attention when driving in a work zone, follow the speed limit and road rules, respect other drivers, make sure all your lights work, keep your windows/windshield clean, and turn on head lights at dusk and any time you need to use your windshield wipers.
American Red Cross, December 2015

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman meets his hero (pic) and the 1-page health news.

About a month ago, my 8-year-old son Jason asked me if I wanted to meet anyone famous. The only answer I could come up with? The Stanley Cup.
Well, thanks to “Museum Night” at the Avalanche game this past Friday, I got to meet the Stanley Cup. As a 46-year-old who can’t really skate backwards very well, I thought I had zero chance of ever getting my hands on the Cup.
Coincidentally, that is the same 8-year old Jason who was with me at the game.
Keep an eye out for our annual Gift of Health certificates that should be arriving soon in your mailbox (if you don’t receive them let us know). It’s a chance for you to help someone you care about feel great in 2016!
Remember we are here to help you, and if you need us we are just a phone call away at 303.300.0424, or a quick reply to this email.
Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Exercise: What Is the Best Type of Exercise?
Any exercise you can do on a regular basis is the best kind of physical activity. Walking is considered one of the optimal choices because it’s easy, safe, and inexpensive. It also doesn’t require training or special equipment, except for a pair of good walking shoes. Brisk walking can burn as many calories as running and is less likely to cause injuries than running or jogging. Additionally, walking is an aerobic and weight-bearing exercise, so it is great for your heart and helps prevent the weakening of the bones known as osteoporosis.
American Academy of Family Physicians, December 2015

Chiropractic: Hip Mobilization with Movement Benefits Hip Osteoarthritis.
Mobilization with movement, like we do with Active Release Techniques at our clinic, is often used in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis. However, there are very few studies evaluating the effectiveness of such manual therapies in the treatment of this common hip condition. A new study involving forty elderly patients with hip osteoarthritis found that pain, hip range of motion, and physical performance all improved immediately after receiving MWM.
Manual Therapies, October 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Night / Shift Work May Increase Breast Cancer Risk.
Women who work non-traditional hours over the course of a career may have a slightly greater risk for a breast cancer diagnosis than those who work “9-5.” Researchers combed through 25 studies regarding “breast cancer risk” and “night work” or “shift work” published during the last twenty years and found long-term night/shift work may be associated with a 9% greater risk for breast cancer.
Gynecology, Obstetrics, & Fertility, December 2015

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman is back at Denver Chiropractic Center after a New Year’s vacation.

As of Monday January 4, 2016 we are back in the office as normal hours resume. We look forward to seeing all of you! If you need us, call us at 303.300.0424 or reply to this email to get straight to Jessica and Samantha at the front desk.

My family and I spent most of New Year’s week skiing up at Winter Park. The snow was great, but it was cooooold!

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On New Year’s Eve we took the Gondola up to the Lodge at Sunspot for their New Year’s Eve Buffet. We had a great time up there, although that night time gondola ride was even colder than the skiing.

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We all hope you had a great New Years, and we look forward to seeing you soon.

This Week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Anxiety Increases Dementia Risk!
After adjusting for depressive symptoms, individuals with high anxiety appear to have a greater risk for dementia later in life. Researchers used data from the Swedish Adoption Twin Study of Aging, a multi-decade study that has followed twins who were separated early in life. They found when only one twin (either identical or fraternal) had a history of high levels of anxiety, they were 6-11% more likely than their sibling to be diagnosed with dementia three decades later.
Alzheimer’s and Dementia, November 2015

Health Alert: Dehydration is Common Among Frail Older Adults.
Serum tests of 188 seniors living in a community setting showed 20% were dehydrated at the time their blood was drawn. Dehydration can be a serious problem among the frail elderly, as it can impair cognition and renal function. The researchers note thirst was not associated with hydration status in this group, suggesting caregivers need to pay closer attention to their residents’ fluid intake.
The Journals of Gerontology, November 2015

Diet: Menus with Calorie Counts May Prompt Healthier Offerings.
Restaurants that list calorie counts on their menus offer more lower-calorie choices than those that don’t provide such information. An analysis of menus from one hundred of the largest chain restaurants in the United States found those with voluntary calorie labeling averaged 140 fewer calories per selection. Co-author Dr. Julia Wolfson writes, “The biggest impact from mandatory menu labeling may come from restaurants decreasing the calories in their menu items rather than expecting consumers to notice the calorie information and, subsequently, order different menu items… Given how often Americans eat in restaurants, if more chain restaurants decrease calories on their menus to a level that we are seeing in restaurants that already label, this has the potential to reduce population-level obesity.”
Health Affairs, November 2015

Exercise: Keeping Physically Active Reduces Depression Risk After a Heart Attack.
The odds of being depressed after a heart attack appear to be significantly lower for those who had been physically active during the years before their heart attack. Researchers found that those who engaged in regular physical activity in the ten years prior to their first heart attack had nearly a 20% lower risk for depression when compared with those who were inactive during the same time period. First author Dr. Linda Ernstsen notes, “Our results add strength to the evidence of a causal link between physical activity and mental health.”
American Journal of Medicine, October 2015

Chiropractic: Manual Therapy Returns Pilot to Air.
Low back pain can be a significant safety risk for a pilot, as it can become a distraction during flight. In a recent case study, a pilot sought a non-pharmacological and noninvasive therapy option for his chronic low back pain. After just three sessions of manual treatment to address sacral, pelvic, and lumbar dysfunction, the pilot reported an 80%+ improvement in pain and was able to return to flight. The case reveals the benefits of manual therapy in the management of chronic back pain among aviators.
Military Medicine, October 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Can Vitamin D Lower Heart Disease Risk?
Vitamin D supplements may improve exercise performance and lower the risk of heart disease. Researchers say that vitamin D can block the action of an enzyme called 11-ßHSD1, which assists in making the stress hormone cortisol. Elevated levels of this hormone can increase blood pressure by restricting the arteries, narrowing blood vessels, and encouraging the kidneys to retain water. Thus, researchers theorize vitamin D could improve exercise performance and lower risk factors for cardiovascular issues by reducing cortisol levels.
Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference, November 2015