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Denver Chiropractor Glenn Hyman presents Denver Chiropractic Center’s 1-Page Health News.

Daily Apple Consumption Helps the Heart.
Consuming fresh fruit, such as apples, each day appears to reduce the risk of dying from either a heart attack or stroke by about one-third. Investigators collected data on more than 500,000 adults between 2004 and 2009 and found that fewer than one-in-five ate fruit on a daily basis. However, the researchers found that those who ate about a half cup of fruit a day had a significantly lower risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Lead researcher Dr. Liming Li reports that participants who ate fruit the most often had lower blood pressure and blood sugar compared to those who ate less fruit, which could explain the reduced risk for heart attacks and stroke.
New England Journal of Medicine, April 2016

 

 

 

Mental Attitude: Sleepless Nights Linked to Changes in the Brain.
Chinese researchers report that insomnia may lead to abnormalities in the white matter of the brain, the tissue which carries information between the various parts of the organ. For the study, the researchers recruited 23 patients with primary insomnia and 30 healthy volunteers. The participants completed surveys that allowed investigators to evaluate their mental status and sleep patterns. Using an advanced MRI technique, the research team also looked at the pattern of water movement in white matter to identify any irregularities. They found that participants with insomnia had significantly reduced white matter integrity in several regions of the brain including the thalamus, which regulates consciousness, sleep, and alertness, as well as the corpus callosum, the area that connects the two halves of the brain. Researcher Dr. Shumei Li notes, “Our results can potentially provide the evidence about how the lack of sleep may lead to the impairment of white matter related to emotional or cognitive disorders.”
Radiology, April 2016

Health Alert: Diabetes Has Quadrupled Worldwide Since 1980.
According to a new report, the number of men and women diagnosed with diabetes around the globe increased from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014, with the most severe increases noted in low- and middle-income countries. Experts say these findings should sound an alarm for large-scale, effective action that focuses on reducing the health and economic impact of diabetes.
The Lancet, April 2016

 

Exercise: Too Few Children Get 60 Minutes of Exercise Daily.
In this study, investigators observed 453 schoolchildren during a one-week period and found that only 15% achieved the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) each day. Furthermore, compared with normal or underweight children, the researchers report that the overweight and obese children in the study were be less active overall and achieved fewer minutes of MVPA during school, out-of-school, and on weekends. Senior author Dr. Jennifer Sacheck comments, “Clearly, schools need to be aware of this disparity and should focus on increasing all intensities of physical activity equally for all children across the school-day.”
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, March 2016

Chiropractic: Musculoskeletal Pain Common in Veterans.
A recent study investigated the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among United States veterans. The study included 5,237,763 former soldiers and found that non-traumatic joint pain (27%), back pain (25%), and osteoarthritis (21%) are the most commonly reported and treated musculoskeletal disorders among those who received Veterans Health Administration care. The findings show that musculoskeletal complaints are highly prevalent, painful, and costly disorders among veterans.
Pain, March 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Vitamin D Levels Linked to Cardiovascular Disease Risk.
New research suggests that the risk of cardiovascular disease could be predicted by measuring levels of total and bioavailable vitamin D in both men and women. The study analyzed the vitamin D levels of 4,200 individuals aged 52-76 and assessed whether vitamin D levels had any effect on future cardiac events. The findings revealed that individuals with low levels of both total vitamin D and bioavailable vitamin D were at the greatest risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and even cardiovascular death.
American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions in Chicago, April 2016

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman Presents Denver Chiropractic Center’s 1-Page Health News

Mental Attitude: Chronic Stress Can Affect Memory.
Individuals subjected to chronic stress due to bullying or a tough job may experience problems with their memory. Researchers found that mice who were repeatedly stressed by larger, more aggressive mice when they tried to find an escape hole in a maze became more forgetful than mice not exposed to the aggressive mice. The researchers say that the mice’s inability to remember coincided with stress-induced inflammation in the brain. They hope that a better understanding of stress, cognition, and mood problems may help create strategies for those suffering from anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Journal of Neuroscience, March 2016

Health Alert: Secondhand Smoke Exacerbates COPD Symptoms.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that makes breathing difficult and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. A recent study found 20% of COPD patients live with an active smoker and 27% were exposed to secondhand smoke during the previous week. For the COPD patient, secondhand smoke exposure is linked to a greater risk for severe exacerbations (51%), nocturnal symptoms (58%), wheezing (34%), and chronic cough (77%).
Thorax, March 2016

Diet: High-Fat Diet May Raise Cancer Risk.
New research suggests that a high-fat diet could increase the risk of colon cancer. In this study, researchers fed healthy mice a high-fat diet (60% of total calories from fat) for nine months and found the mice gained 30-50% more body mass and developed more intestinal tumors than mice on a control diet.
Nature, March 2016

Exercise: Brain Chemicals Affected By Exercise.
Researchers have found that people who exercise not only have better physical fitness than inactive persons, but they also have better mental fitness. Using MRI scans, researchers found that intense exercise increased the levels of two common neurotransmitters called glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid in study participants. The finding offers insights into brain metabolism and how exercise could become an essential part of treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders associated with deficiencies in neurotransmitters. Lead researcher Dr. Richard Maddock adds, “We are offering another view on why regular physical activity may be important to prevent or treat depression… Not every depressed person who exercises will improve, but many will. It’s possible that we can help identify the patients who would most benefit from an exercise prescription.”
Journal of Neuroscience, February 2016

Chiropractic: Is it CTS or Double Crush Syndrome?
Many patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may also have median nerve entrapments further up the course of the nerve (in the neck, shoulder, elbow, etc). When the median nerve is encumbered at two anatomical locations, it’s described as a double crush syndrome (DCS). In this study, researchers compared the results of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) tests on patients with CTS and patients with CTS and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (an example of DCS). The results showed worse nerve function in the patients with DCS, supporting the possibility of more severe CTS symptoms with a lower likelihood of resolution if treatment only focused on the wrist.
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association, September 2015 (Note- we treat both of these conditions with a combination of Active Release Techniques (ART) and chiropractic work. Call us at 303.300.0424)

Wellness/Prevention: Experts Unsure If Seniors Should Have Routine Vision Checks.
A panel of experts concludes there is not enough data to say whether or not seniors should be routinely screened for vision trouble by their primary care physicians. According to the panel, primary care doctors typically check vision with an eye chart test and while this test can detect refractive errors, it does not identify early stage age-related macular degeneration or cataracts. Task force member Dr. Michael Pignone notes, “Older adults who are having vision problems should talk to their primary care doctor or eye specialist… in the absence of clear evidence, primary care doctors should use their clinical judgment when deciding whether to screen for vision problems in patients without vision symptoms.”
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, March 2016

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman is back in the office at Denver Chiropractic Center

The grainy pic below catches me skiing this past Tuesday when I should have been working. You see, for some reason Cherry Creek Schools was closed for Presidents Day and the day after, this past Tuesday. So I played hooky and went skiing with Meredith and the kids. Winter Park had 3 inches of new snow the day before and it was just perfect up in the trees. But I am back in the office, ready to help you keep doing the things you love to do too. Call us 303.300.0424 or reply to this email to get to the front desk.

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Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Slight Signs of Lingering Brain Damage Seen in Young Athletes After Concussion.
A single concussion may cause young children to suffer minor, but lingering, brain damage. In a recent study, researchers used MRI scans to compare the brains of 15 children with a previous concussion to 15 similar kids who hadn’t suffered a concussion. They found that the brains of the concussion sufferers showed signs of subtle disruptions while utilizing attention- and thinking-related skills. The authors recommend longer-term and larger studies to determine if concussion-related alterations in brain function are associated with problems during adulthood.
International Journal of Psychophysiology, December 2015

Health Alert: Too Many Teens Exposed to Secondhand Smoke.
Nearly half of American teens who have never used tobacco are exposed to harmful secondhand smoke despite widespread laws banning smoking in public places. An analysis of data from over 18,000 middle school and high school students reveals that 48% reported being exposed to secondhand smoke in 2013. Investigators also found that secondhand smoke exposure was nine times higher among never-smoking teens with no smoke-free rules in their home and car than teens with 100% smoke-free homes and vehicles.
Pediatrics, February 2016

Diet: Omega-3 May Help Reduce Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.
If individuals at risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consume more omega-3 fatty acids, they may be able to decrease their chance of developing the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that usually affects the small joints in the hands and feet. Unlike osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of joints, causing a painful swelling that can eventually result in bone erosion and joint deformity. Investigators analyzed self-reported data about omega-3 consumption from 30 people who had autoantibodies for rheumatoid arthritis and 47 control patients who did not. They found only 6.7% of patients who had the autoantibodies for RA were taking omega-3 supplements, compared with 34.4% in the control group. Furthermore, they found blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids to be lower in those at risk for RA. Based on the findings, researchers recommend a healthy diet that includes fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as one to three grams of fish oil a day, for those who may be at risk for RA and perhaps other inflammatory diseases.
Rheumatology, September 2015

Exercise: Some Yoga Poses Increase Risks for Glaucoma Patients.
Yoga has become a very popular form of exercise in the United States due to its health benefits. However, a new study suggests that certain poses increase eye pressure and present risks for individuals with glaucoma. Glaucoma affects eyesight, usually due to a build-up of pressure in the eye (called intraocular pressure, or IOP), which can damage the optic nerve. The study found that participants experienced a rise in intraocular pressure in four yoga poses, which included downward dog, standing forward bend, plow, and legs up on the wall. Study author Dr. Jessica Jasien writes, “As we know that any elevated IOP is the most important known risk factor for development and progression of nerve damage to the eye, the rise in IOP after assuming the yoga poses is of concern for glaucoma patients and their treating physicians. In addition, glaucoma patients should share with their yoga instructors their disease to allow for modifications during the practice of yoga.”
PLOS ONE, December 2015

Chiropractic: Sleep Problems and Pain.
A recent study investigated the relationship between sleep problems and chronic pain, as well as other conditions. The study involved data on 1,753 participants and found an association between sleep problems and an increased risk for chronic pain and headaches, as well as an increase in the severity of both abdominal pain and musculoskeletal pain. The results suggest patients with musculoskeletal complaints should also be screened for sleep problems. (Note: If you are near Denver and have sleep problems because of pain we can help with chiropractic and Active Release! Call us 303.300.0424)
Pain, December 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Excess Mass in Mid-Life Increases Dementia Risk.
After reviewing data from 21 published studies, a team of researchers from Imperial College in London reports that individuals who are obese during later adulthood are 1.41 times more likely to develop dementia than those who maintain a healthy weight. Future research will assess how weight loss prior to mid-life influences dementia risk.
Age and Aging, January 2016

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center
303.300.0424
denverback.com

Chiropractic Adjustments Decrease Pain Associated with Scoliosis.

A case study involving two individuals with scoliosis and back pain were treated with chiropractic manipulation. One patient received routine care one to two times per month while the other received care as-needed. The patient treated as-needed continued to have curve progression while the patient who was treated routinely did not. Both individuals reported improvements to their back pain.
Journal Of Manipulative Physiologic Therapeutics, May 1994

Scoliosis Treated with Chiropractic.

In a case study involving a 16-year-old female, chiropractic treatment was associated with a reduction in the curvature of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, even after six months of conventional medical treatment failed to stop curve progression. This suggests that some severe and progressive cases of scoliosis can be helped with chiropractic treatment.
Journal of Alternative Complementary Medicine, July 2008

Video- if you can’t do this, you may have a problem, your odds needing back surgery, and this week’s 1-Page Health News

Hi Glenn,

Happy Monday! Well, the heat is back. And for most of us active people, that’s kind of a good thing. Maybe I’m odd, but I enjoy riding my bike on a really hot day.

There’s an interesting study from the journal Spine showing that back pain patients who started with a chiropractor were 28 times less likely to end up having surgery than patients who started by seeing a surgeon. (see below).

This week, Dr. Stripling has a great video for you on the chair squat. I know, you’re thinking, “The squat again?” Here’s the truth: there are a few basic movements that add up over time. If you can’t get yourself closer to the ground correctly, you wear out your spine. Then, one day, you go to tie a shoe, or pick up a bag of dog food, or sneeze – and blow your back out. We see it day in and day out in our office. So, after reading this week’s 1-Page Health News, I strongly suggest taking a look at this week’s video. Of course, if you have a bad back already, you should learn this under our supervision (call us). Proceed wisely!

Health Alert: What Concussion?
Many United States high school football players think it’s okay to play with a concussion even though they know they are at risk of serious injury. Over 90% of players polled recognized a risk of serious injury if they returned to play too quickly, but only 54% would always or sometimes report their concussion symptoms to their coach. Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Diet: Fight Inflammation!
Chronic inflammation is a condition that can be triggered by obesity and can ultimately lead to both cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Some foods that are known to combat unhealthy inflammation are citrus fruits, leafy greens, tomatoes, wild salmon, and whole foods high in fiber. University of Alabama at Birmingham, March 2013

Exercise: ‘Walkable’ Neighborhoods.
Preschool children are less likely to be obese if they live in a neighborhood that is safe and within walking distance of parks and retail services. Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Chiropractic: I Like Those Odds!
Patients who went to a chiropractor first had were less likely to undergo surgery than those who went to a surgeon first. 42.7% of workers with back injuries who first saw a surgeon had surgery, in contrast to only 1.5% of those who initially saw a chiropractor.  Spine, December 2012

Wellness/Prevention: Brain Power Boost.
Regularly consuming the healthy fats found in fish, extra virgin olive oil, and nuts may assist in maintaining cognitive functions in older individuals. British Medical.
Journal, May 2013.
Video link: Dr. Stripling shows you the chair squat. You really should be able to do this pain free.

Awesome Dog finds a great home:

I’m happy to report that Rooster has found a home. My good friend Dave Kupernick adopted Rooster from my other good friend Andrew Stone. Most of you know that Mr. Stone is the canine behaviorist who trained our 1-year old chocolate lab when she was a pup. If have a dog that has behavioral problems, I strongly recommend you have Mr. Stone help you get your dog “reprogrammed” and behaving in a more civilized manner. Call Andrew Stone directly at 720-366-2238

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Are There Other Tunnels?, by the Active Release certified doctors at Denver Chiropractic Center

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Are There Other Tunnels?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) refers to the median nerve being pinched in a tunnel at the wrist. As the name implies, “carpal” refers to the 8 small bones in the wrist that make up the “U” shaped part of the tunnel and “syndrome” means symptoms that are specific and unique to this condition. As we learned last month, CTS can be affected by nerve pinches more proximal to the wrist, such as at the forearm, elbow, mid-upper arm, shoulder or neck.

To make matters more complex, there are two other nerves in the arm that can also be pinched in different tunnels, and the symptoms of numbing and tingling in the arm and hand occur with those conditions as well. This is why a careful clinical history, examination, and sometimes special tests like an EMG/NCV (electromyogram/nerve conduction velocity) offer the information that allows for an accurate diagnosis of one or more of these “tunnel syndromes” in the “CTS” patient. Let’s look at these different tunnels and their associated symptoms, as this will help you understand the ways we can differentiate between these various syndromes or conditions.

Let’s start at the neck. There are seven cervical vertebrae and eight cervical spinal nerves that exit the spine through a small hole called the IVF (intervertebral foramen). Each nerve, like a wire to a light, goes specifically to a known location which includes: the head (nerves C1, 2, 3), the neck and shoulders (C4, 5), the thumb side of the arm (C6), the middle hand and finger (C7) and the pinky side of the lower arm and hand (C8). If a nerve gets pinched at the spinal level (such as a herniated disk in the neck), usually there is numbness, tingling, and/or pain and sometimes, usually a little later, weakness in the affected part/s of the arm and hand (or numbness in the scalp if it’s a C1-3 nerve pinch).

So, we can test the patient’s sensation using light touch, pin prick, vibration, and/or 2-points brought progressively closer together until 1-point is perceived and then comparing it to the other arm/hand. Reflexes and muscle strength are also tested to see if the motor part of the nerve is involved in the pinch. The exam includes compression tests of the neck to see if the arm “lights up” with symptoms during the test.

Next is the shoulder. Here, the nerves and blood vessels travel through an opening between the collar bone, 1st rib and the chest muscles (Pectorals). As you might think, the nerves and blood vessels can be stretched and pinched as they travel through this opening and can cause “thoracic outlet syndrome.” Symptoms occur when we raise the arm overhead.

Hence, our tests include checking the pulse at the wrist to see if it reduces or lessens in intensity as we raise the arm over the head. At the shoulder, the ulnar nerve is the most commonly pinched nerve, which will make the pinky side of the arm and hand numb, tingly, and/or painful. A less common place to pinch the nerves is along humerus bone (upper arm) by a bony process and ligament that is usually not there or resulting from a fracture. Here, an x-ray will show the problem.

The elbow is the MOST common place to trap the ulnar nerve in the “cubital tunnel” located at the inner elbow near the “funny bone” which we have all bumped more than once. Cubital tunnel syndrome affects the pinky side of the hand from the elbow down. The median/carpal tunnel nerve can get trapped here by the pronator teres muscle, thus “pronator tunnel syndrome.” This COMMONLY accompanies CTS and MUST be treated to obtain good results with CTS patients. The radial nerve can be trapped at the radial tunnel located on the outside of the elbow and creates thumb side and back of the hand numbness/tingling.

Any or all of these nerve can get “trapped” by the muscles that run near them. This is where Active Release Techniques (ART) treatment separates itself for other modalities. ART is the only system that trains providers how to check these entrapment spots muscle by muscle. Once identified, the trained and certified ART provider knows how to release the muscles and remove the pressure. This goes way beyond standard chiropractic treatment or basic physical therapy.

So now you see the importance of evaluating and treating ALL the tunnels when CTS is present so a thorough job is done (which is what we do at Denver Chiropractic Center). Try the LEAST invasive approach first – non-surgical treatment – as it’s usually all that is needed!

Dr. Stripling’s weekly video, Skiing / Snowboard / Snowshoe injuries & the 1-page health news from Denver Chiropractic Center

After spending time with our families this (past) holiday season, those of us who make up the staff of Denver Chiropractic Center (Dr. Hyman, Dr. Stripling, Miss Keri, and Awesome Massage Therapist Erin are back in the office on January 2 at 10AM and ready to help you. It’s going to be a great 2013!

We (Glenn & my wife Meredith) took the kids skiing / snowboarding / snowshoeing, and this season’s snow is looking great. That probably means that some of you are feeling the inevitable aches and pains that come with winter sports. Don’t let pain slow you down, give us a call.

Dr. Stripling and Miss Keri returned from Iowa (gee, I’ve never had employees spend so much time together) to post Dr. Stripling’s latest video for those of you who work at a desk- how to open those shoulders and improve your posture. See previous post for the video.

Here’s this week’s 1-page health news.

Mental Attitude: Anxious Parents? Parents diagnosed with social anxiety disorder are more likely to exhibit less warmth and affection towards their children, criticize them more, and express doubts about their child’s ability to complete a task. This can heighten anxiety in their child, and over time, can increase the chance their child will develop an advanced anxiety disorder of their own. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, November 2012

Health Alert: Parental Math Skills and Medication Errors. Parents with poor math skills (3rd grade level or below) are 5 times more likely to measure the wrong dose of medication for their child than parents with math skills at the 6th grade level or greater. In a study of 289 parents, 27% had math skills at 3rd grade level or below. American Academy of Pediatrics, April 2012

Diet: Processed Meat. Processed meat consumption increases the risk of prostate cancer. Processed red meat was associated with a 10% increased risk of prostate cancer with every 10 grams (about one-third of an ounce) of increased intake. This means stay away from the cheap stuff and spring for grass fed beef, available at Vitamin Cottage and Whole Foods. American Journal of Epidemiology, October 2009

Exercise: 5 Major Reasons. Exercise helps control your weight preventing excess weight gain or maintaining weight loss, combats health conditions and diseases, improves mood, boosts energy, and promotes better sleep. Mayo Clinic

Chiropractic: Spinal Degenerative Joint Disease and Pain. There are several reasons spinal degeneration causes pain: 1. Mechanical compression of nerve by bone, ligament, or the disk. 2. Biochemical mediators of inflammation.
3. Mechanical nerve compression results in decreased blood flow and swelling, which causes lack of proper motion leading to fibrotic tissue formation. Spine, 1989 In our opinion, nothing staves off spinal degeneration better than a healthy diet and regular treatment with Active Release and adjustments.

Wellness/Prevention: Get Your Sleep! Sleep disorders lead to 253 million days of sick leave a year in the United States. 63.2 billion dollars are lost a year due to insomnia. A third of this is due to absence from work, while the other two thirds is due to a loss in productivity at work. 10% of the population suffers from insomnia. Sleep apnea affects 4-5% of the population. University of Bergen, November 2012. Shoot for 7 hours a night, minimum.

Quote: “Those who think they have no time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have to find time for illness.”
~ Edward Stanley

Do the Chiropractors at Denver Chiropractic Center Help Patients With Headaches?

This seems like an easy question to answer, doesn’t it? The answer of course being, YES!!! However, there are many people who suffer with headaches who have never been to a chiropractor or have not even ever considered it as a “good option.”

So, rather than having me “reassure you” that chiropractic works GREAT for headache management, let’s look at the scientific literature to see if “they” (the scientific community) agree or not.

In a 2011 meta-analysis, researchers reviewed journals published through 2009 and found 21 articles that met their inclusion criteria and used the results to develop treatment recommendations. Researchers discovered there is literature support utilizing Chiropractic care for the treatment of migraine headaches of either episodic or chronic migraine. Similarly, support for the Chiropractic treatment of cervicogenic headaches, or headaches arising from the neck region (see last month’s Health Update), was reported

In addition, joint mobilization (the “non-cracking” type of neck treatment such as figure 8 stretching and manual traction) or strengthening of the deep neck flexor muscles may improve symptoms in those suffering from cervicogenic headaches as well. The literature review also found low load craniocervical mobilization may be helpful for longer term management of patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headaches where manipulation was found to be less effective.

We add Active Release Techniques to this treatment arsenal to release tension in the muscles in the neck and at the base of the skull. These tight muscles are often the overlooked culprit in people with headaches,

Okay, we realize this is all fairly technical, so sorry about that. But, it is important to “hear” this so when people ask you why are going to a chiropractor for your headaches, you can say that not only that it helps a lot, but there are a lot of scientific studies that support it too!

Bottom line is that it DOES REALLY HELP and maybe, most importantly, it helps WITHOUT drugs and their related side effects. Just ask someone who has taken some of the headache medications what their side-effects were and you’ll soon realize a non-drug approach should at least be tried first since it carries few to no side effects.

We realize that you have a choice in where you choose your healthcare services.  If you, a friend or family member requires care for headaches, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services and look forward in serving you and your family presently and, in the future. 

What happened in Vegas, Dr. Stripling’s Self-Help video for Neck Pain, and this week’s 1-Page Health News, from Denver Chiropractic Center

This weekend Meredith and I (Glenn) jetted off to Las Vegas so I could teach at the Active Release Techniques seminar there, and so we could hang out at night. Meredith saw (or almost saw, I never did get the story straight) the Victoria Secret models and Magic Johnson (not together). I did not. Anyway, as always Vegas was fun for a couple of days and then got really old really quickly.

Dr. Stripling and Keri held down the fort here at the office, and shot a video on a great neck stretch for those of you who work at a desk all day. The link is below.

Next week is the last week of the year for us, and we’ll be closed from December 22 through January 1, opening back up on January 2. Dr. Hyman will be on call in case of emergency. His cell phone # will be on our voicemail.

Mental Attitude: Reaction To Stress. How people react to stress determines how that stress will affect their health. Study volunteers were separated in two groups: 1) those who let their troubles affect their emotional state and 2) those who didn’t let stress bother them at all. At a 10-year follow up, those who let stress affect them (group 1) were more likely to suffer from chronic health problems. Penn State, November 2012

Health Alert: Hip Replacement and Stroke Risk. Hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke risk is ~4% higher within 2 weeks of total hip replacement surgery. A hemorrhagic stroke is brought on by bleeding in the brain, while an ischemic stroke is brought on by arterial blockage. Total hip replacement is extremely common in the United States. Around 1 million hip replacement surgeries are done around the world every year, 300,000 in the United States alone. Stroke, November 2012

Diet: Vitamin D Levels Decreasing? Women with health issues such as arthritis, hypothyroidism, cancer, high blood pressure, and osteoporosis are much more likely to have inadequate levels of vitamin D during seasons with decreased daylight. 28% of women had deficient levels and 33% had insufficient levels of vitamin D. Women taking supplements were able to significantly elevate their vitamin D levels.
American Society for Clinical Pathology, November 2012

Exercise: Exercise When You’re Sick? The choice to exercise or not sometimes depends on the sickness or disease. Our bodies work harder and use more energy when we are fighting an illness. If symptoms are above the neck (sore throat, runny nose), it is probably okay to exercise. If you’re sick but still want to exercise, simply reduce your intensity and duration. You should not exercise if you have body aches, fever, diarrhea or vomiting, shortness of breath or chest congestion, dizziness or light-headedness. When resuming your regular exercise routine, try starting with 50% effort and 50% duration. Loyola University Health System, November 2012

Active Release Techniques: Sliding Nerves? Nerves need to slide past muscles and other structures in your body. As tight muscles put pressure or pinch nerves, they interrupt the blood’s circulation to the nerve. This can cause symptoms like carpal tunnel in the wrist sciatica in the hip and thigh, and many more problems. Active Release Techniques is the only system that specifically includes treatment protocols for releasing nerve entrapments. Note: Dr. Glenn Hyman is still the only Active Release Techniques instructor practicing in Denver.

Wellness/Prevention: Staying Healthy! “Check out Dr. Stripling’s Self-Help video for Neck Pain:
http://www.denverback.com/?p=966

Quote: “So many people spend their health gaining wealth, and then have to spend their wealth to regain their