Seeing a Chiropractor: Many MDs Don’t Know Their Patients Receive Chiropractic Care.

According to a new report, many Americans with chronic pain who use utilize chiropractic services don’t discuss these treatments with their medical doctor. A survey of more than 6,000 patients revealed that 42% of those who used chiropractic care failed to mention the treatment to their family physician. Most of these individuals added that they would have gladly shared this information if their doctor asked. Lead author Dr. Charles Elder notes, “We want our patients to get better, so we need to ask them about the alternative and complementary approaches they are using. If we know what’s working and what’s not working, we can do a better job advising patients, and we may be able to recommend an approach they haven’t tried.”
American Journal of Managed Care, July 2015

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Race Report – Xterra Snow Mountain Ranch 2015

This Past Saturday I lined up with the other racers at Snow Mountain Ranch Resort near Winter Park at another Xterra Race (#3 for me this season, #27 in my race career). The race is called Xterra Snow Mountain Ranch, but I think they should call it Xterra Winter Park.

Anyway, we took off into a chilly 63 degree swim through grassy water at around 9AM. The weather was great and I got through the 1000m swim in 19:39, more than 3 minutes faster than last year. The bike trails up there are great (I don’t know if it’s open to mountain bikes outside of this race, but I hope it is, because the riding is great in there). As always, lots of climbing, lots of rocky descents and lots of fun. I biked in 1:48:45, around 11 minutes faster than last year.

 

 

That’s a rare action-pic of me on the bike. Off to the run after the bike. Not going to lie: I kind of hit the wall – racers know what I mean – and my legs felt like they weighed a hundred pounds each. It took me a less-than-awesome 50 minutes to cover the 4 somewhat hilly miles (yikes, that’s awful). Anyway, I finished in 3:04:54, over 14 minutes better than last year. Once again, I’ll take it.

Next up for me is Xterra Buffalo Creek August 22nd, where I’ll be a part of one of the many relay teams proudly representing my triathlon club – Altitude Multisport Club. I’ll be riding the bike leg – 22 miles on the MTB. Maybe see you up there?

Back from Costa Rica

I’m back in the office after a long weekend in Costa Rica with my wife (no kids). We had a great time surfing (yes we got up and rode several waves), mountain biking (just me), and sea kayaking & hanging out on the beach. Yes, we saw the monkeys. Anyway, I am back and ready to work. If you need us, call us 303.300.0424.
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This week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Having a Panic Disorder May Affect the Heart.
An analysis of data collected from more than one million men and women reveals that those with a panic disorder have up to a 36% higher risk for having a heart attack and up to a 47% greater risk for developing heart disease when compared with individuals without a panic disorder. Senior study author Dr. John Beltrame writes, “This new data suggesting a link between panic disorders and coronary heart disease, underscores the importance of these patients seeking medical attention for their chest pain symptoms and not merely attributing them to their panic attacks. Furthermore, if cardiac investigations reveal that the chest pain is due to an evolving heart attack, then early treatment may be lifesaving.”
Psychological Medicine, June 2015

Health Alert: Many Children of Smokers Are Exposed to Dangerous Fumes at Home.
Nearly 40% of parents in the United States who smoke cigarettes do so in their home. Past research has shown that having a smoke-free home shields children from exposure to secondhand smoke and also cuts the risk they will smoke later in life.
Preventing Chronic Disease, June 2015

Diet: Added Sugar Is Bad Sugar.
Some experts now contend that plain table sugar or even all-natural honey can be just as harmful as high-fructose corn syrup when consumed in sugar-sweetened beverages and foods. Though other experts disagree with this statement, they all agree on one point: people need to limit their consumption of any sugary sweetener if they want to stay healthy and fit. Dr. Kathleen Page, an expert on diabetes and obesity and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine adds, “The practical point is you don’t need any added sugar in your diet to have a healthy diet.”
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 2015

Exercise: Children Becoming Less Fit.
New evidence reveals that child fitness levels are falling at an even faster rate than first thought. In a newly published study, researchers from the University of Essex tested the fitness levels of 300 ten-year-old boys and girls and compared them with data collected from ten-year-old children in 1998 and 2008. They found that overall fitness levels in this age group are declining about 1% each year and the drop in fitness levels is likely due to the increasingly sedentary lifestyles of children.
University of Essex, June 2015

Chiropractic: Workers in Pain Are More Likely to Have Multiple Conditions…
South Korean researchers reviewed health surveys completed by 29,711 workers and found that those with musculoskeletal complaints (back pain, neck pain, etc.) were 5.2-6.1 times more likely to also report anxiety, depression, or general fatigue. Perhaps the most troubling finding was that 32.26% of those surveyed suffer from at least one musculoskeletal disorder.
Safety and Health at Work, June 2015

Wellness/Prevention: If You Have a Pool, Think Safety.
Experts say that drowning is the leading cause of death for children in the United States under age five, and children are more likely to drown in a backyard pool than any other body of water. If you have a pool at home, Dr. Natalie Lane, the medical director of the emergency department at Children’s Hospital of Georgia, offers the following safety guidelines: never leave children alone in or near a pool, always have children supervised by an adult who can swim, make sure to have a clear view of the children of all times, keep children away from pool drains or other openings, never use inflatable flotation devices as life vests, enroll children in swim lessons, have a fence at least four feet (1.2 meters) high around the pool with a self-closing and self-latching gate, remove all toys and floats from the pool area and place a safety cover over the pool when it’s not in use, and learn CPR in case of an emergency.
Children’s Hospital of Georgia, June 2015

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center- This week’s 1-page health news

Our very popular rehab expert, clinical assistant and X-Ray tech, Kacee, told us last week that she and her son are moving back to North Dakota to be closer to family. Her last day will be June 18. So there’s still time to come on in and say goodbye to Kacee. She’ll be tough to replace.

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Leafy Greens May Protect Aging Brains.
An evaluation of the eating habits and mental abilities of over 950 older adults revealed that eating a single serving of leafy green vegetables per day may reduce an individual’s risk for dementia. The study found that those who consumed one or two servings of spinach, kale, mustard greens, collards, or similar vegetables on a daily basis experienced slower mental deterioration than those who ate no leafy greens at all. Dr. Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry and neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine writes, “It makes sense that leafy green vegetables would have an effect on mental health… We know generally that what you eat, or don’t eat, can affect your risk for high blood pressure and vascular disease, which can both then worsen the course of dementia.”
American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting, March 2015

New Broccoli Reduces Cholesterol.
Eating ten or more weekly servings of a new variety of broccoli has been demonstrated to reduce Low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol) levels by about 6%. This new broccoli variety known as Beneforte was bred to contain two to three times more glucoraphanin, a compound that is converted to sulphoraphane inside the body. Previous research has observed that sulphoraphane activates genes that keep the body from converting excess dietary fat and sugar into bad cholesterol.
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, April 2015

Exercise: Exercise Helps Fibromyalgia Patients.
An 18-week functional training program for women with fibromyalgia (FM) resulted in reductions in both pain and tender points along with a positive impact on their overall quality of life. If further studies verify these findings, such training (which consisted of two sessions of in-water exercise and one session of on-land exercise each week) could play an important role in helping FM patients maintain an independent lifestyle.
Modern Rheumatology, April 2015

Chiropractic: Could Migraines and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Be Linked?
Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome can increase an individual’s risk for migraine headaches, and migraines may increase the likelihood of one developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 26,000 Americans and found that the risk of migraine was 2.6 times higher in people with carpal tunnel syndrome. Similarly, the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was 2.7 times higher among migraine sufferers.
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, March 2015

What Part of the Day Do Teens Become Less Active?
While adolescents have been observed to be less physically active and spend more time performing sedentary activities as they grow older, no previous studies have analyzed how these changes occur during the course of a teen’s average week. In this study, 363 teens wore accelerometers at both age 12 and age 15, and researchers recorded how much time was spent each day being inactive or performing either light physical activity or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. They found that by age 15, participants were sedentary 7-8% more often during school hours and both after school and on weekends. Across the board, students spent about 7% less time performing light physical activities while moderate-to-vigorous activity levels remained largely unchanged. Due to the increase in sedentary time across all aspects of an adolescent’s week, the investigators recommend that future interventions intended to help teens become more active need to focus on both their in-school and after-school/weekend activities.
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2015

Denver Chiropractor to attend 2015 Active Release Techniques (ART) Instructor’s meeting.

I’ll be out of the office on Friday, April 17, to attend the annual Active Release Techniques (ART) instructors’ meeting. – I’ve been an ART instructor since 2002. So if you need to come see us, don’t wait- give us a call and get in! 303.300.0424.

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Loneliness & Social Isolation Associated with Early Mortality.
Researchers analyzed data from 70 studies regarding loneliness, social isolation, and living alone and found that social isolation was linked to an increased risk of early death. On the other hand, they note that the presence of social relationships has a positive influence on overall health.
Perspectives on Psychological Science, March 2015

Vitamin D Helps Reduce Chronic Pain.
Chronic pain patients given a daily supplement of 4000 IUs of vitamin D over the course of 90 days experienced substantial declines in both perceived pain and inflammation.
Lupus, April 2015

Can Yoga Help Pregnant Women with Depression?
A small study suggests that yoga may help ease depression symptoms in pregnant women. The study included 34 expectant mothers with depression who attended yoga classes for ten weeks with encouragement to perform yoga at home. The researchers found that the women’s depression scores fell during the study, and the more yoga they did, the better their mental health. Lead author Dr. Cynthia Battle adds, “Prenatal yoga really does appear to be an approach that is feasible to administer, acceptable to women and their health care providers, and potentially helpful to improve mood.”
Women’s Health Issues, March 2015

Chiropractic: Always Wear Your Seat Belt!
While seat belts are often considered a life-saving device, they also save drivers from serious injuries in the event of a car accident. An analysis of data from 10,479 drivers who were involved in motor vehicle collisions between 2006 and 2011 found that seat belt use reduced a driver’s risk for traumatic brain injury from 10.4% (no seatbelt) to 4.1% (seatbelt). Seatbelt users are also half as likely to suffer a traumatic injury to the head, face, or neck. Although seatbelt use reduces a driver’s risk for a serious spinal fracture, the researchers did find that seat belt use doubles the risk of a sprain or strain injury to the back. However, they note that treating minor back injuries can cost over thirteen times less than treating serious back injuries (like bone fractures), not to mention the impact such a traumatic injury can have to a an individual’s quality of life. Bottom line: Always wear your seatbelt!
Traffic Injury Prevention, August 2015

Should You Take a Daily Multivitamin?
Over the course of eleven years, older male physicians who took a daily multivitamin were 8% less likely to receive a cancer diagnosis than their peers who did not take a daily multivitamin. For those with a previous history of cancer, taking a daily multivitamin was linked to a 27% lower risk for a second cancer diagnosis. The authors of the study note that if all men took a daily multivitamin, it could prevent nearly 68,000 cancers per year.
Postgraduate Medicine, January 2015

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center and this week’s 1-Page Health News

We are in the very final stages of our office remodel, and I’m happy to say that all of our treatment rooms are open again. During the construction, there were a few weeks where we had just one treatment room, and that’s why it was tough for some of you to get in to see us. We are truly sorry about the inconvenience, but we are fully operational once again! So if you need us, call us 303.300.0424 (or reply to this email to get straight to Natalie at front desk.)

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Your Speaking Skills May Be the Key to Making Things Happen.
Investigators at the University of Chicago report that your voice may be instrumental in advancing your career. In the study, researchers found that evaluators were more moved to action by well-spoken pitches than well-written submissions.
Journal of Psychological Science, February 2015

Health Alert: New Data on E-Cigarette Use Among College Students.
Surveys completed by nearly 1,400 college students show that 30% have at least tried e-cigarettes. Among current e-cigarette users, 87% previously used another nicotine product and nearly 35% used other non-cigarette tobacco products during the previous month. The data also show that students who use e-cigarettes tend to have average or below-average grades.
Drug and Alcohol Dependence, April 2015

Diet: Salt Intake May Affect More Than Your Blood Pressure.
A new study warns that eating too much salt may damage your blood vessels, heart, kidneys, and brain, even if you don’t develop high blood pressure. Researchers say that even if people do not develop high blood pressure, excessive salt consumption can lead to reduced function of the inner lining of blood vessels, enlargement of the left ventricle of the heart, kidney function issues, and damage to the sympathetic nervous system.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, March 2015

Exercise: Can Exercise Improve Your Child’s Math Grades?
After performing physical fitness tests on 273 elementary school students, Indian researchers found that those with the greatest levels of aerobic fitness scored 8-11% higher on math tests than their least fit peers, even after adjusting for gender, socioeconomic status, and weight status. Because physical fitness could elevate a student’s grade from a C to a B or a B to an A, the researchers recommend educators and policymakers look for opportunities to promote physical activity during the school day.
PLOS ONE, March 2015

Chiropractic: Sitting Increases Back Pain Risk?
While most people think of back pain as resulting from strenuous physical activity, a new study finds that the more time an individual spends sitting each day at both home and work, the greater their risk for a back injury. In the study, researchers found that among a group of 201 blue-collar workers, those who spent the most time sitting on their average day were three times more likely to experience back pain when compared with those who sit the fewest hours on a given day.
PLOS ONE, March 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Insufficient Sleep Linked to Overnight Increases in Blood Pressure.
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that individuals who don’t sleep enough hours experience a rise in blood pressure and an elevated heart rate when they do sleep, the opposite of what occurs in those who get sufficient quality sleep. Researcher Dr. Naima Covassin explains, “We know high blood pressure, particularly during the night, is one of the major risk factors for heart disease, and Americans typically do not get enough sleep. For the first time, we demonstrated that insufficient sleep causes increases in nighttime blood pressure and dampens nocturnal blood pressure dipping by using a controlled study that mimics the sleep loss experienced by many people.”
Mayo Clinic, March 2015

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman celebrates Denver Chiropractic Center’s 17th birthday

In April of 1998, I started Denver Chiropractic Center is a tiny 1-room office on Yale. The front desk, the waiting room, and my treatment table were all in one little 400 square foot space. Now, 17 years later (April 1st is Denver Chiropractic Center’s 17th birthday), our newly remodeled office will feature 3 treatment rooms, a dedicated rehab room, an onsite digital X-ray suite, and a much bigger waiting room. We look forward to taking care of you for years to come in our brand new state-of-the art Chiropractic and Active Release facility!

Remember, we are OPEN during our remodel. We are now the first door on the left when you get off of the elevators. If you need us, call us! 303.300.0424, or reply to this email to get straight to Natalie at the front desk. Our schedule has been completely full most days, so don’t procrastinate :-). In fact I’ll be out Thursday and Friday this week for spring break, so really, don’t wait!

This week’s 1-Page Health News…
Mental Attitude: Do Smartphones Promote Mental Laziness?
Researchers assessed 660 individuals to compare smartphone usage among both analytical and intuitive thinkers. Intuitive thinkers use gut feelings and instinct when making decisions, while analytical thinkers tend to give more thought to solving problems. The team found that intuitive thinkers (and not analytical thinkers) regularly use their smartphone’s search engine rather than their own brains in an attempt to solve problems. The researchers conclude that smartphones enable intuitive thinkers to be even lazier thinkers than normal. Co-lead study author Dr. Nathaniel Barr adds, “Decades of research has revealed that humans are eager to avoid expending effort when problem-solving and it seems likely that people will increasingly use their smartphones as an extended mind.”
Computers in Human Behavior, March 2015

Diet: Mediterranean Diet Appears to Cut Heart Risks.
A study that included more that 2,500 Greek adults who were tracked for ten years found that those who closely adhered to a Mediterranean-style diet significantly lowered their risk of heart disease. The Mediterranean diet is high in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, fish, and olive oil. The researchers say that individuals who most closely followed the diet were 47% less likely to develop heart disease when compared with those who did not follow the diet as closely during the decade-long study. Study co-author Dr. Ekavi Georgousopoulou notes, “Because the Mediterranean diet is based on food groups that are quite common or easy to find, people around the world could easily adopt this dietary pattern and help protect themselves against heart disease with very little costs.”
American College of Cardiology, March 2015

Exercise: Exercise Is Good for the Brain!
Exercise may increase the size of brain regions involved with maintaining both balance and coordination, based on a study that compared MRI scans of identical twins. Researchers found that the twin who was more active possessed more brain volume in the areas of the brain related to movement. Study co-author Dr. Urho Kujala notes, “[the changes] may have health implications in the long-term, such as possibly reducing the risk of falling and mobility limitations in older age.”
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, March 2015

Chiropractic: Here’s Why High Heels May Cause Back Pain…
Wearing heels over two inches tall (or ~50mm) can increase the curve of the lumbar spine by about ten degrees, placing added pressure on the two lower lumbar disks (L5/S1 and L4/L5). This may be one explanation as to why low back pain complaints are more common among women who regularly wear high heels compared with those who do not.
European Spine Journal, March 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Getting Healthier Earlier Keeps Heart Failure at Bay Later in Life.
An analysis of more than 18,000 people tracked for over 40 years reveals the importance of healthy living during middle-age. A research team found that individuals who were obese and possessed hypertension and diabetes by age 45 were diagnosed with heart failure about 11 to 13 years earlier than those who had none of the three risk factors. Study leader Dr. Faraz Ahmad concludes, “The message from this study is that you really want to prevent or delay the onset of these risk factors for as long as possible. Doing so can significantly increase the number of years you are likely to live free of heart failure.”
American College of Cardiology, March 2015
As always, thanks for reading,

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center: 1-Page Health News.

According to a new report, many Americans fail to follow recommended safety practices while handling and cooking poultry. Investigators found that less than two-thirds of consumers have a food thermometer, and less than 10% of those who do have them actually check to see if poultry is cooked. In addition, they found that nearly 70% of consumers rinse or wash raw poultry before cooking it, which is potentially unsafe because contaminated water can splash and spread bacteria to other foods and kitchen surfaces. The authors say the findings support the need for updated materials to educate consumers about food safety.
Journal of Food Protection, January 2015posium in San Francisco, January 2015

Mental Attitude: Meditation May Reduce Brain Aging.
Deterioration of the brain is a normal process of aging that leads to functional impairments. However, a new study suggests that you may be able to reduce such deterioration through meditation. Researchers found that individuals who meditated showed significantly lower gray matter loss in numerous brain regions when compared with those who did not meditate. Lead author Dr. Eileen Luders writes, “Accumulating scientific evidence that meditation has brain-altering capabilities might ultimately allow for an effective translation from research to practice, not only in the framework of healthy aging but also pathological aging.”
Frontiers in Psychology, January 2015

Diet: Health Benefits of Moderate Drinking Overestimated, Say Researchers.
Past research suggests that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption has numerous health benefits. However, a new study published in the British Medical Journal claims that such benefits are overestimated. According to the latest research, many of the studies associating alcohol use with health benefits are debatable, and the protective effects of alcohol may be confounded by categorizing former drinkers and non-drinkers into one group. The researchers explain, “The effect of such biases should therefore be borne in mind when evaluating findings from alcohol health studies – particularly when seeking to extrapolate results to the population level.”
British Medical Journal, February 2015

Remember, if you need us, call us! 303.300.0424, or reply to this email to get straight to Natalie at the front desk. We are open during our office remodel! As always, thanks for reading,

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center

A video for knees- Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center

Make sure your knees are healthy enough to try this and make sure your chair is against the wall. Enjoy!

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center: This Week’s 1-Page Health News

There may be some truth behind the old wives’ tale that people should keep warm to avoid catching colds. A new study finds the immune system is less effective when it is colder, allowing a common cold virus to enter the nose and replicate more easily. The finding suggests that varying the temperature influences host immunity, rather than the virus, leading the researchers to conclude “cooler temperatures can enable replication of the common cold virus, at least in part, by diminishing antiviral immune responses.”
PNAS, January 2015

 

Mental Attitude: A Happy Childhood is Good for Heart Health Later in Life.
The findings of a new study reveal that adults who had a stable and healthy childhood are more likely to have better cardiovascular health than their peers who had less-stable childhoods. The research team found that adults with the most psychosocial advantages in childhood were 14% more likely to have a normal weight, 12% more likely to be a nonsmoker, and 11% more likely to have healthy blood sugar levels – all of which are connected to better heart health. Examples of psychosocial advantages include being in a family with good health habits, being in a financially secure family, and being taught proper social skills during childhood. Senior study author Dr. Laura Pulkki-Raback adds, “The choices parents make have a long-lasting effect on their children’s future health, and improvement in any one thing can have measurable benefits.”
Circulation, January 2015

Diet: Study Identifies Common Food Allergen Levels that Cause Allergic Reactions.
Individuals with common food allergies are often confused and uncertain if they should eat a food product with vague food labeling such as “may contain nuts.” In the United States, approximately 15 million people have food allergies, with children accounting for about six million of these cases. In a new study, investigators found that participants who were the most sensitive to food allergens needed to consume between 1.6-10.1 mg of hazelnut, peanut, or celery protein, 27.3 mg of fish, or 2.5 grams of shrimp protein to stimulate an allergic response. The research team hopes their findings will better inform food allergy sufferers of the allergen doses that may trigger a reaction and contribute to improved food product labeling in the future.
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, January 2015

Exercise: Does Exercise Slow the Aging Process?
Older amateur cyclists who have participated in their sport for decades demonstrated muscle strength, lung power, and exercise capacity similar to non-cyclists about 25 years their junior. This finding underscores the importance of staying physically active well into retirement age.
The Journal of Physiology, January 2015

Chiropractic: Your Eye Doctor Gets Back Pain Too!
There’s a growing body of research that back and neck pain can affect individuals in all job types, even ophthalmologists. A survey completed by 518 ophthalmologists in the United Kingdom found that 50.6% suffered from back pain and 31.8% suffered from neck pain during the previous twelve months, with a total of 62.4% having experienced either one or both. The researchers suspect that awkward and prolonged working postures may be at least partially to blame, and modifications to the work environment may decrease the risk of musculoskeletal injuries among members of this professional group.
International Ophthalmology, January 2015 (If you have back pain, call us! Even if you’re not an eye doctor 🙂

Wellness/Prevention: Vitamin D May Play Role in Colon Cancer Survival.
Advanced colon cancer patients with higher vitamin D levels respond better to chemotherapy and targeted anti-cancer drug treatment than patients with lower vitamin D levels, according to a study that included over 1,000 patients. Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, the deputy chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society writes, “These findings are interesting, and show that vitamin D may have a role in improving outcomes in cancer care.”
Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, January 2015