Dr. Stripling’s 3 more for the core, Race season 2013, and this week’s 1-Page Health News.

This week, we have another video for you on core exercises. Dr. Stripling shows three basic exercises that will strengthen and condition the entire body. As simple as these movements seem, there are a few cues to keep in mind to improve both safety and performance. Check it out with the link below.
For those who race, triathlon / cycling / running season are swinging into full gear right around now. Dr. Hyman’s race schedule for 2013 is looking like this:

  • June 1, Xterra Lory, Horsetooth Reservoir
  • July 20, Xterra Beaver Creek, Avon / Beaver Creek
  • August 17, Rattlesnake Olympic, Aurora Reservoir
  • August 24, Xterra Buffalo Creek

Stay tuned for Dr. Stripling’s Event schedule, which he says will include some CrossFit Competitions and some Century rides.

Mental Attitude: Smoking and Anxiety. The belief that smoking relieves stress is pervasive, but likely wrong. Smoking is actually anxiogenic (causes anxiety) and successful quitters usually experience a drop in anxiety.
British Journal of Psychiatry, January 2013

Health Alert: Obesity and Stroke: In males and females ages 5-14, the number of ischemic stroke hospitalizations increased 31% and 36%, respectively, from 1994 to 2007. For ages 15-34 the increase was 51% for males and 17% for females. For ages 35- 44, the increase was 47% for men and 36% for females. The increase in obesity seems to be the primary cause.
CDC, February 2011

Exercise: Aerobic or Resistance Training? A study of 234 adults compared the effects of aerobic training (AT), resistance training (RT) and both aerobic training and resistance training (AT/RT). Researches found the participants in the AT/RT group both increased lean mass (muscle) and decreased body fat, while the RT group did not decrease body fat, and the AT group did not increase lean mass. Journal of Applied Physiology, December 2012

Active Release / Chiropractic: Pregnancy and Back Pain. 20% of women who suffer from severe back pain during pregnancy refrain from having more children out of fear their severe back pain would recur with another pregnancy. Just for the record, WE treat pregnant women using both Active Release and gentle adjustments. Back pain and sciatica are the most common complaints. Obstetrics & Gynecology, February 1998

Wellness/Prevention: How Are You Doing This Year? Only 8% of people succeed in achieving their top New Year’s
Resolution. Journal of Clinical Psychology, December 2012

Quote: “Leave all the afternoon for exercise and recreation, which are as necessary as reading. I will rather say more necessary because health is worth more than learning.” ~ Thomas Jefferson

Car accident injuries- how to avoid them, part 2

Last month, we discussed car safety features, proper headrest position, how to prepare for a crash, and to seek immediate treatment as ways to minimize the chances of suffering from whiplash in the event of an accident. Here are four more ways to avoid or minimize whiplash:

PAY ATTENTION WHILE YOU DRIVE. Too often, we get distracted while driving. Any time our eyes leave the road, the potential for an accident increases significantly. This can occur when changing the radio to a different station, eating while driving, reading while driving, talking on the phone, texting (equals the effects of 2-3 alcoholic beverages), driving under the influence of certain prescription medications (pain killers for example), driving under the influence of alcohol or other chemical agents, and turning your head during conversation. We have a responsibility when we are driving to keep our eyes on the road, as many accidents occur within split seconds of time. If we are not paying attention, we will not be able to avoid a potential collision.

THE CONCEPT OF “NO CRUSH, NO CRASH INJURY” IS SIMPLY NOT TRUE. In fact, just the opposite is true. That is, the greater the amount of crushing metal at the time of collision, the greater the amount of energy absorption that occurs, resulting in less force transferred to the contents inside the vehicle (namely you or me). This is why, many times, people are injured in low speed collisions because there is no energy absorbed by crushing metal as noted by the absence of or, minimal damage to the car.

FOLLOWING YOUR DOCTOR’S ORDERS. It is very important that we do not inadvertently hurt or harm ourselves further by NOT following the advice of our health care practitioner. This means initially using ice to reduce inflammation and swelling, possibly wearing a soft cervical collar during the first few days after the injury to “rest” the injured structures, following proper nutritional advice for optimal healing benefits, and following exercise recommendations. This last treatment approach is vital in the prevention of long term, chronic neck complaints. Other ways you can REALLY help are to follow cervical traction orders.

Cervical traction is a very effective method of reducing muscle spasm, separating the joint spaces, improving disk nutrient transfer and water content, reduce the pinching effect of the nerves, and as a result, speeding up the recovery process. Follow your treatment schedule; that is, DON’T SKIP APPOINTMENTS! During office visits, it is necessary to discuss not only what is working well, but also what may not be working so modifications to your care plan can occur on a timely basis. The primary goal of whiplash management is to prevent the condition from becoming chronic and long-term, and the first few weeks of treatment are critical!

ERGONOMIC MODIFICATIONS. An important part of managing whiplash injuries is preventing daily irritations from tasks that we have to do. Hence, we will discuss adjusting your work station for optimum positioning and avoidance of poor posture, such as using office chairs with arm rests, sitting posture modifications, and computer monitor positioning. Proper sleep positions and pillow design are also reviewed.

Low Back Pain and Balance

Statistically, most people (estimated to be about 90%) will seek care for Low Back Pain (LBP) at some point in their lifetime. Last month, we discussed the role foot orthotics play in the management of LBP by improving balance, and it seems appropriate to discuss other ways we can improve our balance, hence the topic this month!

Balance is a skill that is learned as we develop. Initially, as infants, we have not developed the “neuromotor pathways” or, sequence of signals between the brain and our toes, feet, ankles, knees, hips, and so on. The constant flow of sensory information received and processed by the brain prompts motor messages to be sent back to our limbs and allows us to move in a progressively more coordinated manner as we develop.

This natural progression of developing motor control starts with crude, rather uncontrolled movement of the fingers, hands, arms, legs, and feet, and soon, we learn to hold up our head, scoot, roll over, crawl, stand, and eventually walk (usually during the first 12 months of life). The learning process of recognizing sounds, voice quality and inflections, and words occurs simultaneously.

This bombardment of sensory information to the brain leads to the ability to gradually perform highly integrated functions including walking, running, jumping, and dancing. As part of that learning process, falling frequently occurs. We all recall the challenges of learning how to ride a bike, swim, do a somersault, climb a tree, swing, dance, do gymnastics, ski, and on and on. As time passes and we enter middle age, we become more sedentary.

As a result, we start losing our “proprioceptive edge” and become less steady, leading to more frequent balance loss and falls. Eventually, we have to hold on to hand railings or the wall in order to keep our balance and falling occurs more frequently. Couple this gradual loss of balance with bone demineralization (osteoporosis) and the risk of a fracture, such as a hip or vertebra, increases as well.

So the question arises, what can we do to slow down this process and maybe even reverse it? The answer is, A LOT!!! Just like muscles shrink and atrophy if they are not used, so does our ability to maintain our balance. We have to keep challenging our balance in order to keep those neuromotor pathways open. That need doesn’t stop after childhood, and in fact, becomes more important as we age. Last month, we talked about the “normal” length of time people can stand on one foot with the eyes open verses closed.

If you tried the test, do you remember the steadiness difference? This “test” can be used at various time intervals, such as once a month, as you add balance challenging exercises to your daily routine. Frequently, people will find that within the first 2-4 weeks, they will feel more “sure” or secure on their feet, and even may not feel the need for a cane, or they’ll reach out less often for a hand rail. Start with simple exercises like standing with your feet together and hold that position for progressively longer times (eyes open and closed). We will continue this discussion next month with more balance stimulating exercises.

This week’s video from Dr. Jeff Stripling from Denver Chiropractic Center – the hip hinge

Dr. Stripling from Denver Chiropractic Center shows you hamstring stretches!

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Crossfit Gym & this week’s 1-Page Health News

People are always asking me (Glenn) where I workout. Meredith and I train using a blend of Crossfit and Crossfit Endurance in exactly 91 sq ft of our basement (plus the outside stuff of course). You’d be surprised how much you can do in 91 sq ft with kettlebells, a barbell bumper set, a pull up bar and some imagination. (Secret hint for our loyal blog readers- Stay tuned for an upcoming announcement regarding Crossfit, Dr. Stripling & myself – it’s gonna be a biggie!) Anyway, here’s my present Cossfit Gym:

Speaking of Dr. Stripling, his popular video series is back this week. This time around, Dr. Stripling shows you some quick and easy self-help strategies for the low back.The  link is at the bottom of this email.

Health Alert: Childhood Obesity Rates Falling! During the first decade of the 21st century, childhood obesity rates among children in lower income families in the United States have decreased (14.94% in 2010 vs. 15.21% in 2003). The Journal of the American Medical Association, December 2012

Diet: Red Wine and Cancer. Resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine, is thought to help prevent cancer. Lab models designed to identify any benefits from consuming the amount of resveratrol in 2 daily glasses of wine found a reduction in the rate of bowel tumors by around 50%.(Note-Yay!) University of Leicester, December 2012

Exercise: Good Vibrations. Within 7 months of starting a poor diet, normal mice became obese, with significant damage to their immune and skeletal systems. Daily 15-minute treatments of low-intensity vibration, barely perceptible to human touch, helped restore the immune and skeletal systems of the mice towards those of mice fed a regular diet. If this effect translates to humans, it could have benefits for obese people suffering from immune problems related to their obesity. The FASEB Journal, December 2012

Chiropractic: Quit Smoking! Smokers suffering from spinal disorders and related back pain reported greater discomfort than those who stopped smoking during an 8 month treatment period. Patients who had never smoked and prior smokers reported significantly less back pain than current smokers and those who had quit smoking during their care. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, December 2012

Wellness/Prevention: Sleep and Pain? In a recent study, participants who slept 1.8 hours more per night had increased daytime alertness and less pain sensitivity than those who slept their normal amount. Sleep, December 2012

Quote: “What is called genius is the abundance of life and health.” ~ Henry David Thoreau

Dr. Stripling’s weekly video, Skiing / Snowboard / Snowshoe injuries & the 1-page health news from Denver Chiropractic Center

After spending time with our families this (past) holiday season, those of us who make up the staff of Denver Chiropractic Center (Dr. Hyman, Dr. Stripling, Miss Keri, and Awesome Massage Therapist Erin are back in the office on January 2 at 10AM and ready to help you. It’s going to be a great 2013!

We (Glenn & my wife Meredith) took the kids skiing / snowboarding / snowshoeing, and this season’s snow is looking great. That probably means that some of you are feeling the inevitable aches and pains that come with winter sports. Don’t let pain slow you down, give us a call.

Dr. Stripling and Miss Keri returned from Iowa (gee, I’ve never had employees spend so much time together) to post Dr. Stripling’s latest video for those of you who work at a desk- how to open those shoulders and improve your posture. See previous post for the video.

Here’s this week’s 1-page health news.

Mental Attitude: Anxious Parents? Parents diagnosed with social anxiety disorder are more likely to exhibit less warmth and affection towards their children, criticize them more, and express doubts about their child’s ability to complete a task. This can heighten anxiety in their child, and over time, can increase the chance their child will develop an advanced anxiety disorder of their own. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, November 2012

Health Alert: Parental Math Skills and Medication Errors. Parents with poor math skills (3rd grade level or below) are 5 times more likely to measure the wrong dose of medication for their child than parents with math skills at the 6th grade level or greater. In a study of 289 parents, 27% had math skills at 3rd grade level or below. American Academy of Pediatrics, April 2012

Diet: Processed Meat. Processed meat consumption increases the risk of prostate cancer. Processed red meat was associated with a 10% increased risk of prostate cancer with every 10 grams (about one-third of an ounce) of increased intake. This means stay away from the cheap stuff and spring for grass fed beef, available at Vitamin Cottage and Whole Foods. American Journal of Epidemiology, October 2009

Exercise: 5 Major Reasons. Exercise helps control your weight preventing excess weight gain or maintaining weight loss, combats health conditions and diseases, improves mood, boosts energy, and promotes better sleep. Mayo Clinic

Chiropractic: Spinal Degenerative Joint Disease and Pain. There are several reasons spinal degeneration causes pain: 1. Mechanical compression of nerve by bone, ligament, or the disk. 2. Biochemical mediators of inflammation.
3. Mechanical nerve compression results in decreased blood flow and swelling, which causes lack of proper motion leading to fibrotic tissue formation. Spine, 1989 In our opinion, nothing staves off spinal degeneration better than a healthy diet and regular treatment with Active Release and adjustments.

Wellness/Prevention: Get Your Sleep! Sleep disorders lead to 253 million days of sick leave a year in the United States. 63.2 billion dollars are lost a year due to insomnia. A third of this is due to absence from work, while the other two thirds is due to a loss in productivity at work. 10% of the population suffers from insomnia. Sleep apnea affects 4-5% of the population. University of Bergen, November 2012. Shoot for 7 hours a night, minimum.

Quote: “Those who think they have no time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have to find time for illness.”
~ Edward Stanley

Dr. Jeff Stripling from Denver Chiropractic Center brings you this week’s video

Do the Chiropractors at Denver Chiropractic Center Help Patients With Headaches?

This seems like an easy question to answer, doesn’t it? The answer of course being, YES!!! However, there are many people who suffer with headaches who have never been to a chiropractor or have not even ever considered it as a “good option.”

So, rather than having me “reassure you” that chiropractic works GREAT for headache management, let’s look at the scientific literature to see if “they” (the scientific community) agree or not.

In a 2011 meta-analysis, researchers reviewed journals published through 2009 and found 21 articles that met their inclusion criteria and used the results to develop treatment recommendations. Researchers discovered there is literature support utilizing Chiropractic care for the treatment of migraine headaches of either episodic or chronic migraine. Similarly, support for the Chiropractic treatment of cervicogenic headaches, or headaches arising from the neck region (see last month’s Health Update), was reported

In addition, joint mobilization (the “non-cracking” type of neck treatment such as figure 8 stretching and manual traction) or strengthening of the deep neck flexor muscles may improve symptoms in those suffering from cervicogenic headaches as well. The literature review also found low load craniocervical mobilization may be helpful for longer term management of patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headaches where manipulation was found to be less effective.

We add Active Release Techniques to this treatment arsenal to release tension in the muscles in the neck and at the base of the skull. These tight muscles are often the overlooked culprit in people with headaches,

Okay, we realize this is all fairly technical, so sorry about that. But, it is important to “hear” this so when people ask you why are going to a chiropractor for your headaches, you can say that not only that it helps a lot, but there are a lot of scientific studies that support it too!

Bottom line is that it DOES REALLY HELP and maybe, most importantly, it helps WITHOUT drugs and their related side effects. Just ask someone who has taken some of the headache medications what their side-effects were and you’ll soon realize a non-drug approach should at least be tried first since it carries few to no side effects.

We realize that you have a choice in where you choose your healthcare services.  If you, a friend or family member requires care for headaches, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services and look forward in serving you and your family presently and, in the future. 

Dr. Jeff Stripling from Denver Chiropractic Center demonstrates a hip flexor stretch for Office workers, crossfitters, and everyone in between