Month: April 2016

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman Presents Denver Chiropractic Center’s 1-Page Health News

Mental Attitude: Chronic Stress Can Affect Memory.
Individuals subjected to chronic stress due to bullying or a tough job may experience problems with their memory. Researchers found that mice who were repeatedly stressed by larger, more aggressive mice when they tried to find an escape hole in a maze became more forgetful than mice not exposed to the aggressive mice. The researchers say that the mice’s inability to remember coincided with stress-induced inflammation in the brain. They hope that a better understanding of stress, cognition, and mood problems may help create strategies for those suffering from anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Journal of Neuroscience, March 2016

Health Alert: Secondhand Smoke Exacerbates COPD Symptoms.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that makes breathing difficult and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. A recent study found 20% of COPD patients live with an active smoker and 27% were exposed to secondhand smoke during the previous week. For the COPD patient, secondhand smoke exposure is linked to a greater risk for severe exacerbations (51%), nocturnal symptoms (58%), wheezing (34%), and chronic cough (77%).
Thorax, March 2016

Diet: High-Fat Diet May Raise Cancer Risk.
New research suggests that a high-fat diet could increase the risk of colon cancer. In this study, researchers fed healthy mice a high-fat diet (60% of total calories from fat) for nine months and found the mice gained 30-50% more body mass and developed more intestinal tumors than mice on a control diet.
Nature, March 2016

Exercise: Brain Chemicals Affected By Exercise.
Researchers have found that people who exercise not only have better physical fitness than inactive persons, but they also have better mental fitness. Using MRI scans, researchers found that intense exercise increased the levels of two common neurotransmitters called glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid in study participants. The finding offers insights into brain metabolism and how exercise could become an essential part of treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders associated with deficiencies in neurotransmitters. Lead researcher Dr. Richard Maddock adds, “We are offering another view on why regular physical activity may be important to prevent or treat depression… Not every depressed person who exercises will improve, but many will. It’s possible that we can help identify the patients who would most benefit from an exercise prescription.”
Journal of Neuroscience, February 2016

Chiropractic: Is it CTS or Double Crush Syndrome?
Many patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may also have median nerve entrapments further up the course of the nerve (in the neck, shoulder, elbow, etc). When the median nerve is encumbered at two anatomical locations, it’s described as a double crush syndrome (DCS). In this study, researchers compared the results of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) tests on patients with CTS and patients with CTS and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (an example of DCS). The results showed worse nerve function in the patients with DCS, supporting the possibility of more severe CTS symptoms with a lower likelihood of resolution if treatment only focused on the wrist.
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association, September 2015 (Note- we treat both of these conditions with a combination of Active Release Techniques (ART) and chiropractic work. Call us at 303.300.0424)

Wellness/Prevention: Experts Unsure If Seniors Should Have Routine Vision Checks.
A panel of experts concludes there is not enough data to say whether or not seniors should be routinely screened for vision trouble by their primary care physicians. According to the panel, primary care doctors typically check vision with an eye chart test and while this test can detect refractive errors, it does not identify early stage age-related macular degeneration or cataracts. Task force member Dr. Michael Pignone notes, “Older adults who are having vision problems should talk to their primary care doctor or eye specialist… in the absence of clear evidence, primary care doctors should use their clinical judgment when deciding whether to screen for vision problems in patients without vision symptoms.”
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, March 2016

Denver Chiropractor has a secret weapon

I’m often asked how I figure out my training for the Xterra off road triathlons (swim, mountain bike, and trail run) that I compete it. Simple. I listen to this guy.
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That’s Xterra Pro, coach, and friend of mine Cody Waite. He and his wife Kathy own Sessions:6 Endurance and Crossfit. I’ve been lucky enough know Cody and Kathy for my whole racing career, and I probably would be out of the sport without their guidance. You can check them by clicking the link at the bottom of this article.

We are back from spring break and in the office Monday-Friday this week. If you need us call 303.300.0424 or reply to this email to get straight to the desk.
Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Fidgeting May Be Important for Learning in Students with ADHD.
Students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often get into trouble for fidgeting in class, but a new study suggests that fidgeting may help them learn. The research team based their findings on observing the amount of fidgeting 25 children with ADHD did while solving memory problems. They suspect that fidgeting may increase physiological arousal similar to what stimulant medication does for a child with the disorder. The findings suggest that teachers and parents should focus less on whether a child is sitting still and more on whether their work gets done.
Journal of Attention Disorders, February 2016

Health Alert: Radiation for Prostate Cancer May Carry Other Risks.
An analysis of 21 studies has found that radiation treatment for prostate cancer may place men at a slight increased risk for other cancers such as bladder, colon, and rectal cancers. Oncologist Dr. Anthony Zietman writes, “[The study] confirms our belief that second malignancy should be added to the already long list of avoidable hazards associated with treatment for those men with low-risk prostate cancer who simply need no treatment at all.” He adds that concerns about secondary cancers “should not, however, stand in the way of an effective and well-studied treatment being given to men with higher grade, lethal prostate cancer for whom the potential benefit simply dwarfs the risk.”
British Medical Journal, March 2016

Diet: Can Fruits and Veggies Lower Blood Pressure?
A review of 25 published studies concerning 334,468 patients revealed a link between greater consumption of fruits and vegetables and a lower risk of hypertension. The authors add that those of Asian descent appear to benefit the most, as studies conducted with Asian populations showed those who consumed the most servings of fruits and veggies per day were 30% less likely to develop high blood pressure than those who ate the fewest servings of produce each day.
Journal of Clinical Hypertension, January 2016

Exercise: Exercise Helps Some Smokers Quit.
According to a new study, between 20% and 33% of smokers are considered to have high-anxiety sensitivity and smoke to cope with stress, making it more difficult for them to quit. In this study, investigators found that 26% of high-anxiety sensitivity smokers who were involved in a 15-week exercise program successfully abstained from smoking compared with only 12% in a control group who attended wellness sessions. After six months, 23% of the exercise group continued to abstain from smoking while just 10% of the wellness education group managed the same. The findings suggest that exercise can reduce anxiety sensitivity symptoms, doubling the chances of smoking cessation among adults with higher anxiety levels.
Psychosomatic Medicine, April 2016

Chiropractic: Cervical Dysfunction and TMD?
A team of Brazilian researchers found evidence that patients with a diagnosed temporomandibular disorder (TMD) may also have cervical dysfunction that may possibly contribute to their TMD symptoms. In this study, twenty TMD patients and 20 healthy controls underwent a series of tests that measured pain, disability, and sensitivity to hot and cold at several body sites. They found the TMD patients were significantly more likely to report neck pain and disability and also more likely to have abnormal sensitivity to pain and cold sensations in their cervical region than those in the control group. The authors of the study believe their findings point to a relationship between TMD and the neck.
Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, February 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Breathalyzer-Locked Car Ignitions Save Lives.
In the 18 states that require in-car breathalyzers with ignition interlocks for anyone convicted of drunken driving, researchers have observed a 15% decrease in alcohol-related deaths. Researcher Dr. Elinore Kaufman adds, “Other states have proven [a mandatory interlock law] is feasible, and we’re contributing proof that it is effective. There should be no remaining barrier for the remaining half of states to adopt it.”
American Journal of Public Health, March 201

Once again, you can learn more about Cody & Kathy Waite, and Sessions:6 by clicking here:

http://www.sessions6.com/