Month: February 2016

Denver Chiropractic Center Weekly Health Update: Hockey guy moves up (pic), short week alert, and the 1-Page Health News

He started when we was 4, and now our 6-year-old hockey player Zach (who likes being called Zachy) is moving up to U8 hockey in April. This past Saturday was his “graduation day” from Arapahoe Warriors Mighty Mites. It’s hard to believe how time flies!
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Speaking of time flying by, my boys are off this Thursday and Friday because the teachers have conferences. I am taking those two days off to ski with them. We’ll be in the office Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday this week from 9:00-5:30, so if you need us, call us and get in: 303.300.0424- to get to Jessica and Samantha at the desk.

And now onto this week’s 1-Page Health News.

Mental Attitude: Is Self-Esteem Driven By Universal Mechanisms?
According to a new international study, self-esteem increases as people grow older, and men tend to have higher levels of self-esteem than women. The findings were based on data collected from more than 985,000 people from 48 countries between 1999 and 2009. Lead author Dr. Wiebke Bleidorn writes, “This remarkable degree of similarity implies that gender and age differences in self-esteem are partly driven by universal mechanisms; these can either be universal biological mechanisms such as hormonal influences or universal cultural mechanisms such as universal gender roles. However, universal influences do not tell the whole story.”
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, January 2016

Health Alert: Hyperactivity Increases Risk for Traumatic Dental Injury.
Children with hyperactivity symptoms are more likely to sustain a traumatic dental injury (TDI). Researchers reviewed the medical records of 230 school children and found those whose parents reported signs of hyperactivity were 2.33 times more likely to experience a TDI than those without parental-reported hyperactivity symptoms.
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, January 2016

Diet: Eating Fruit and Veggies Linked to Better Grades.
Using data collected from 47,203 Canadian adolescents as part of the 2012-2013 Youth Smoking Survey, researchers from the University of Waterloo conclude that only about 10% currently meet the Canadian government’s national fruit and vegetable intake recommendations (7-8 servings per day). The researchers also found that those who did consume the recommended amounts of produce per day are also more likely to earn mostly A’s or B’s on their report cards.
The Journal of School Health, February 2016

Exercise: Diet & Exercise Improves Ability to Exercise Among Those with a Common Type of Heart Issue.
A new study claims that obese older patients with a common type of heart failure can improve their ability to exercise without shortness of breath by either restricting calories or doing aerobic exercise. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (a measure of how well the left ventricle of the heart pumps with each contraction) is the most rapidly increasing form of heart failure. Exercise intolerance is the primary symptom of this chronic heart failure condition, and over 80% of patients with this condition are overweight or obese. In this small study, the authors found that peak Vo2 (volume of oxygen that an individual can use in one minute) increased significantly with either increased exercise or a healthier diet, and the combination of a healthy diet with exercise produced an even greater increase in exercise capacity.
Journal of the American Medical Association, January 2016

Chiropractic: Lower Vitamin D Linked to Older Women with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.
Past studies have suggested that vitamin D plays a role in protecting the nerves from injury or degeneration. In a new study, investigators found that the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome was higher among women who were vitamin D deficient than women who had healthy vitamin D levels, especially in those under the age of 50. The study suggests improving vitamin D status could help women under the age of 50 reduce their risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome and related conditions. (Note- we get excellent results by treating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Active Release Technique. Call us, we can help 303.300.0424.)
The Journal of Hand Surgery, December 2015

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center
303.300.0424
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Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman is back in the office at Denver Chiropractic Center

The grainy pic below catches me skiing this past Tuesday when I should have been working. You see, for some reason Cherry Creek Schools was closed for Presidents Day and the day after, this past Tuesday. So I played hooky and went skiing with Meredith and the kids. Winter Park had 3 inches of new snow the day before and it was just perfect up in the trees. But I am back in the office, ready to help you keep doing the things you love to do too. Call us 303.300.0424 or reply to this email to get to the front desk.

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Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Slight Signs of Lingering Brain Damage Seen in Young Athletes After Concussion.
A single concussion may cause young children to suffer minor, but lingering, brain damage. In a recent study, researchers used MRI scans to compare the brains of 15 children with a previous concussion to 15 similar kids who hadn’t suffered a concussion. They found that the brains of the concussion sufferers showed signs of subtle disruptions while utilizing attention- and thinking-related skills. The authors recommend longer-term and larger studies to determine if concussion-related alterations in brain function are associated with problems during adulthood.
International Journal of Psychophysiology, December 2015

Health Alert: Too Many Teens Exposed to Secondhand Smoke.
Nearly half of American teens who have never used tobacco are exposed to harmful secondhand smoke despite widespread laws banning smoking in public places. An analysis of data from over 18,000 middle school and high school students reveals that 48% reported being exposed to secondhand smoke in 2013. Investigators also found that secondhand smoke exposure was nine times higher among never-smoking teens with no smoke-free rules in their home and car than teens with 100% smoke-free homes and vehicles.
Pediatrics, February 2016

Diet: Omega-3 May Help Reduce Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.
If individuals at risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consume more omega-3 fatty acids, they may be able to decrease their chance of developing the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that usually affects the small joints in the hands and feet. Unlike osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of joints, causing a painful swelling that can eventually result in bone erosion and joint deformity. Investigators analyzed self-reported data about omega-3 consumption from 30 people who had autoantibodies for rheumatoid arthritis and 47 control patients who did not. They found only 6.7% of patients who had the autoantibodies for RA were taking omega-3 supplements, compared with 34.4% in the control group. Furthermore, they found blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids to be lower in those at risk for RA. Based on the findings, researchers recommend a healthy diet that includes fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as one to three grams of fish oil a day, for those who may be at risk for RA and perhaps other inflammatory diseases.
Rheumatology, September 2015

Exercise: Some Yoga Poses Increase Risks for Glaucoma Patients.
Yoga has become a very popular form of exercise in the United States due to its health benefits. However, a new study suggests that certain poses increase eye pressure and present risks for individuals with glaucoma. Glaucoma affects eyesight, usually due to a build-up of pressure in the eye (called intraocular pressure, or IOP), which can damage the optic nerve. The study found that participants experienced a rise in intraocular pressure in four yoga poses, which included downward dog, standing forward bend, plow, and legs up on the wall. Study author Dr. Jessica Jasien writes, “As we know that any elevated IOP is the most important known risk factor for development and progression of nerve damage to the eye, the rise in IOP after assuming the yoga poses is of concern for glaucoma patients and their treating physicians. In addition, glaucoma patients should share with their yoga instructors their disease to allow for modifications during the practice of yoga.”
PLOS ONE, December 2015

Chiropractic: Sleep Problems and Pain.
A recent study investigated the relationship between sleep problems and chronic pain, as well as other conditions. The study involved data on 1,753 participants and found an association between sleep problems and an increased risk for chronic pain and headaches, as well as an increase in the severity of both abdominal pain and musculoskeletal pain. The results suggest patients with musculoskeletal complaints should also be screened for sleep problems. (Note: If you are near Denver and have sleep problems because of pain we can help with chiropractic and Active Release! Call us 303.300.0424)
Pain, December 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Excess Mass in Mid-Life Increases Dementia Risk.
After reviewing data from 21 published studies, a team of researchers from Imperial College in London reports that individuals who are obese during later adulthood are 1.41 times more likely to develop dementia than those who maintain a healthy weight. Future research will assess how weight loss prior to mid-life influences dementia risk.
Age and Aging, January 2016

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center
303.300.0424
denverback.com