Month: July 2015

Back from Costa Rica

I’m back in the office after a long weekend in Costa Rica with my wife (no kids). We had a great time surfing (yes we got up and rode several waves), mountain biking (just me), and sea kayaking & hanging out on the beach. Yes, we saw the monkeys. Anyway, I am back and ready to work. If you need us, call us 303.300.0424.
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This week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Having a Panic Disorder May Affect the Heart.
An analysis of data collected from more than one million men and women reveals that those with a panic disorder have up to a 36% higher risk for having a heart attack and up to a 47% greater risk for developing heart disease when compared with individuals without a panic disorder. Senior study author Dr. John Beltrame writes, “This new data suggesting a link between panic disorders and coronary heart disease, underscores the importance of these patients seeking medical attention for their chest pain symptoms and not merely attributing them to their panic attacks. Furthermore, if cardiac investigations reveal that the chest pain is due to an evolving heart attack, then early treatment may be lifesaving.”
Psychological Medicine, June 2015

Health Alert: Many Children of Smokers Are Exposed to Dangerous Fumes at Home.
Nearly 40% of parents in the United States who smoke cigarettes do so in their home. Past research has shown that having a smoke-free home shields children from exposure to secondhand smoke and also cuts the risk they will smoke later in life.
Preventing Chronic Disease, June 2015

Diet: Added Sugar Is Bad Sugar.
Some experts now contend that plain table sugar or even all-natural honey can be just as harmful as high-fructose corn syrup when consumed in sugar-sweetened beverages and foods. Though other experts disagree with this statement, they all agree on one point: people need to limit their consumption of any sugary sweetener if they want to stay healthy and fit. Dr. Kathleen Page, an expert on diabetes and obesity and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine adds, “The practical point is you don’t need any added sugar in your diet to have a healthy diet.”
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 2015

Exercise: Children Becoming Less Fit.
New evidence reveals that child fitness levels are falling at an even faster rate than first thought. In a newly published study, researchers from the University of Essex tested the fitness levels of 300 ten-year-old boys and girls and compared them with data collected from ten-year-old children in 1998 and 2008. They found that overall fitness levels in this age group are declining about 1% each year and the drop in fitness levels is likely due to the increasingly sedentary lifestyles of children.
University of Essex, June 2015

Chiropractic: Workers in Pain Are More Likely to Have Multiple Conditions…
South Korean researchers reviewed health surveys completed by 29,711 workers and found that those with musculoskeletal complaints (back pain, neck pain, etc.) were 5.2-6.1 times more likely to also report anxiety, depression, or general fatigue. Perhaps the most troubling finding was that 32.26% of those surveyed suffer from at least one musculoskeletal disorder.
Safety and Health at Work, June 2015

Wellness/Prevention: If You Have a Pool, Think Safety.
Experts say that drowning is the leading cause of death for children in the United States under age five, and children are more likely to drown in a backyard pool than any other body of water. If you have a pool at home, Dr. Natalie Lane, the medical director of the emergency department at Children’s Hospital of Georgia, offers the following safety guidelines: never leave children alone in or near a pool, always have children supervised by an adult who can swim, make sure to have a clear view of the children of all times, keep children away from pool drains or other openings, never use inflatable flotation devices as life vests, enroll children in swim lessons, have a fence at least four feet (1.2 meters) high around the pool with a self-closing and self-latching gate, remove all toys and floats from the pool area and place a safety cover over the pool when it’s not in use, and learn CPR in case of an emergency.
Children’s Hospital of Georgia, June 2015

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center