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Category: Fibromayalgia

Denver Chiropractor is ready to help with back pain, neck pain and more!

Don’t let pain, injury or stiffness get in the way of your summer. We are here to help you. We are also here to help your friends or family. Dr. Hyman has 18 years of experience treating back pain, neck pain and headaches. He also gets great results with shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees and ankles. There is no reason to let pain slow you down, whether it’s new or old.

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Call us today at 303.300.0424 and get ready to get back in the game! Or just reply to this email and get straight to Jessica at the front desk. We look forward to helping you!

 

Attention men over 40, you can restore the Warrior Within– If you are interested in losing weight, building muscle, and getting rid of fatigue / irritability (or other symptoms), we have something new for you. Natural hormone balance for men is a way to optimize testosterone and cortisol levels naturally – no dangerous drugs or untested herbs – using diet, training and coaching from a fellow over-40 guy who understands (Me: I fixed myself up using these exact protocols). If you’re interested you can learn more on our website: http://www.denverback.com/forMen-Over-40.

 

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

 Diet: The Good & Bad News About Higher Calcium Intake.
According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), men aged 51-70 should consume 1,000 mg of calcium daily, increasing to 1,200 mg at age 71. NIH experts also recommend that women take in 1,200 mg of calcium daily starting at age 51. In a new study, a research team analyzed the calcium intake as well as the heart disease, stroke, and fracture risk of 2,199 men and 2,704 women over 50 years of age. The team found that participants who had a higher calcium intake had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than those with a lower calcium intake; however, the analysis found the risk of fracture or stroke did not significantly decrease among those with a higher calcium intake.
The Endocrine Society, April 2016

Exercise: Just 75 Minutes of Exercise Per Week Has Benefits!
The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality, accounting for approximately 3.2 million deaths annually. Past evidence suggests that regular physical activity can lead to risk reductions of at least 20-30% for more than 25 chronic health conditions and premature mortality. However, the ideal amount and intensity of exercise to recommend to the general public is still a topic that’s hotly debated among the experts. Current physical activity guidelines recommend 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise per week, but a new review of the published literature indicates that just half this level of activity may still lead to noticeable health benefits. The authors of the review write, “There is compelling evidence that health benefits can be accrued at a lower volume and/or intensity of physical activity. These health benefits are seen in both healthy and clinical populations.”
Canadian Journal of Cardiology, April 2016

Chiropractic: How Does Obesity Increase the Risk of Low Back Pain?
Obesity is known to be an independent risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders; however, the mechanism behind the association between obesity and lower back pain is not yet fully understood. In an effort to add to the available research, Nigerian scientists investigated the spinal curvature of 300 individuals of varying body shapes/sizes and found those with both an above-normal body mass index and waist-hip ratio were more likely to have greater curvature in the lumbar spine. This suggests the spines of those who are overweight or obese have an increased curve (“sway back”) to accommodate a greater load which the researchers speculate may increase their risk for developing lower back pain.
Patient Preference and Adherence, March 2016

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman Presents Denver Chiropractic Center’s 1-Page Health News

Mental Attitude: Chronic Stress Can Affect Memory.
Individuals subjected to chronic stress due to bullying or a tough job may experience problems with their memory. Researchers found that mice who were repeatedly stressed by larger, more aggressive mice when they tried to find an escape hole in a maze became more forgetful than mice not exposed to the aggressive mice. The researchers say that the mice’s inability to remember coincided with stress-induced inflammation in the brain. They hope that a better understanding of stress, cognition, and mood problems may help create strategies for those suffering from anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Journal of Neuroscience, March 2016

Health Alert: Secondhand Smoke Exacerbates COPD Symptoms.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that makes breathing difficult and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. A recent study found 20% of COPD patients live with an active smoker and 27% were exposed to secondhand smoke during the previous week. For the COPD patient, secondhand smoke exposure is linked to a greater risk for severe exacerbations (51%), nocturnal symptoms (58%), wheezing (34%), and chronic cough (77%).
Thorax, March 2016

Diet: High-Fat Diet May Raise Cancer Risk.
New research suggests that a high-fat diet could increase the risk of colon cancer. In this study, researchers fed healthy mice a high-fat diet (60% of total calories from fat) for nine months and found the mice gained 30-50% more body mass and developed more intestinal tumors than mice on a control diet.
Nature, March 2016

Exercise: Brain Chemicals Affected By Exercise.
Researchers have found that people who exercise not only have better physical fitness than inactive persons, but they also have better mental fitness. Using MRI scans, researchers found that intense exercise increased the levels of two common neurotransmitters called glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid in study participants. The finding offers insights into brain metabolism and how exercise could become an essential part of treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders associated with deficiencies in neurotransmitters. Lead researcher Dr. Richard Maddock adds, “We are offering another view on why regular physical activity may be important to prevent or treat depression… Not every depressed person who exercises will improve, but many will. It’s possible that we can help identify the patients who would most benefit from an exercise prescription.”
Journal of Neuroscience, February 2016

Chiropractic: Is it CTS or Double Crush Syndrome?
Many patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may also have median nerve entrapments further up the course of the nerve (in the neck, shoulder, elbow, etc). When the median nerve is encumbered at two anatomical locations, it’s described as a double crush syndrome (DCS). In this study, researchers compared the results of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) tests on patients with CTS and patients with CTS and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (an example of DCS). The results showed worse nerve function in the patients with DCS, supporting the possibility of more severe CTS symptoms with a lower likelihood of resolution if treatment only focused on the wrist.
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association, September 2015 (Note- we treat both of these conditions with a combination of Active Release Techniques (ART) and chiropractic work. Call us at 303.300.0424)

Wellness/Prevention: Experts Unsure If Seniors Should Have Routine Vision Checks.
A panel of experts concludes there is not enough data to say whether or not seniors should be routinely screened for vision trouble by their primary care physicians. According to the panel, primary care doctors typically check vision with an eye chart test and while this test can detect refractive errors, it does not identify early stage age-related macular degeneration or cataracts. Task force member Dr. Michael Pignone notes, “Older adults who are having vision problems should talk to their primary care doctor or eye specialist… in the absence of clear evidence, primary care doctors should use their clinical judgment when deciding whether to screen for vision problems in patients without vision symptoms.”
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, March 2016

Fibromyalgia – It’s Hard to Explain

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a condition that typically has a slow, gradual onset that starts out mild and gradually worsens. The symptoms associated with FM include generalized pain all over the body (above and below the waist including neck, shoulders, chest, upper back, arms, hips, buttocks, legs, and feet). The pain can be symmetrical or more intense on the left or right side AND it can vary from day to day. To top it all off, the pain is “chronic” and is usually present for three or more months, sometimes for years, before the FM patient might even mention it to their health care provider. The onset can be so gradual that other issues often become the center of focus until the intensity gets to the point where the patient FINALLY complains.To better appreciate the complexity of FM, there are two types of FM: Primary and Secondary.
Primary FM has no specific cause while secondary FM is linked to something such as trauma associated with a car accident or sports injury, a condition such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic fatigue syndrome, restless leg syndrome (RLS), and others. Either way, it is often NOT the kind of thing many patients “bring up” during the discussion of history with their health care provider, especially if something else is bothering them that may be more pressingSo, how does one explain the symptoms of FM? Words such as a deep ache, burning, tingling, shooting, tender, pins and needles, stiffness, and flu-like symptoms are often utilized when describing FM symptoms. Almost always, these complaints have been present for a long time – or for at least three months. Often, the patient is reluctant and almost embarrassed to mention it due to the difficulty in describing the symptoms and the fact that they often don’t know the cause. Equally, many doctors, “have an attitude” that is negative and/or non-supportive of the diagnosis of FM making it even more likely FM patients won’t pursue the condition with other health care providers. This polarization by physicians is a very common issue and often the reason FM sufferers continue to “put up” with their condition rather than consult with others.

The KEY to the diagnosis of FM includes the following: 1) Widespread pain NOT limited to one area of the body; 2) Greater than three months of symptom duration; 3) Symptoms including fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression/anxiety, as well as memory and/or concentration complaints; 4) Symptoms severe enough that they interfere with daily living activities/daily life; and 5) Difficulty finding an answer to the cause of the symptoms, USUALLY involving more than one health care provider. Even though awareness by both the general population and health care providers has improved in the last few years, research has shown that 92% of FM patients have talked to their doctor about their complaints, but this resulted in only 24% being diagnosed.

Another challenge confronting healthcare providers in making a diagnosis of fibromyalgia is because it can’t be seen on an x-ray or as an alteration on a blood test. Other diseases have to be “ruled out” before the diagnosis is even considered, but as was previously stated, secondary FM results from other conditions making it ALL the more challenging! It boils down to a very careful history and a physical exam has to be performed by the health care provider and the provider MUST believe in the diagnosis of FM. Tools such as the Fibromyalgia Pain Assessment can also be very helpful AND it’s available online for the FM patient to access. Bring those results with you to the provider for added help in making the diagnosis!

If you, a friend or family member requires care for Fibromyalgia, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services!

Content Courtesy of Chiro-Trust.org. All Rights Reserved.

Fibromyalgia: Dietary Considerations

In last month’s Health Update, we discussed fibromyalgia (FM) management from a multi-modal approach, which included dietary recommendations to reduce inflammation. We’ll cover this topic in more detail this month…

Anti-inflammatory foods can be broken down into four categories: 1) Fruits and vegetables; 2) Protein Sources; 3) Fats and Oils; and 4) Beverages.

In the fruits and vegetables category, whole fruits, berries, and vegetables in general are rich in good things like vitamins, minerals, fiber, anti-oxidants, and phytochemicals. In particular, green and brightly colored vegetables and whole foods (such as broccoli, chard, strawberries, blueberries, spinach, carrots, and squash) are great choices.

Besides being low in calories, high in fiber, rich in vitamin/minerals and more, berries EVEN taste good! For example, one cup of strawberries contains >100mg of vitamin C (similar to a cup of orange juice), which helps our immune system function. One cup of blueberries includes a little less vitamin C but it has minerals, phytochemicals, and anti-oxidants at only 83 calories per cup. A cup of cranberries has only 44 calories (it can also help with bladder infections), and a cup of raspberries has 64 calories and has vitamin C and potassium. Less common, but equally nutritious, are loganberries, currants, gooseberries, lingonberries, and bilberries. Put these, or a mixture of these, on salads, yogurt, or a whole grain cereal and enjoy a VERY satisfying snack or meal! The health benefits of phytochemicals and flavonoids include cancer prevention, bladder infection treatment, and may even help your eyesight (such as from lutein in blueberries and raspberries).

Protein sources include fish/seafood, especially oily ocean fish like salmon and tuna, as these are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Soy and soy foods like tofu and tempeh as well as legumes are great plant sources of protein, though some doctors may recommend staying away from soy. Nuts such as walnuts, almonds, pecans, and Brazil nuts are also great protein sources.

Fats and Oils: Omega-3 fatty acids can be found in flax seeds, canola oil, and pumpkin seeds, as well as cold-water oily fish. Other fats that are anti-inflammatory include monounsaturated fatty acids, which are found in olive oil, avocados, and nuts and have been found to be cardiovascular disease “friendly” as well. Other healthy oils include rice bran oil, grape seed oil, and walnut oil.

Beverages: Our bodies need water! Of course, tap, sparkling, or bottled water are great sources of water. So are 100% juices, herbal tea, low-sodium vegetable juice, and if tolerated, low or non-fat milk.

Meal suggestions include: Breakfast – oatmeal with fresh berries and walnuts; Snacks – whole fruits, nuts, seeds, and fresh vegetables; Lunch and Dinner– choose fish and less fatty red meats; cook with olive and canola oil; load up a salad with fresh vegetables and fruit, avoid deep fried foods – rather, bake, broil, poach, or stir-fry instead. Fill up HALF of your dinner plate with dark green or brightly colored vegetables. Avoid the following: junk food, high-fat meats, sugar (sodas, pastries, candy, rich desserts, and sweetened cereals), highly processed foods, trans-fats and saturated fats (i.e., bacon and sausage), and white flour products (get 100% whole grain instead). Some research suggests not eating “nightshade plants” like tomatoes and eggplant.

If you, a friend or family member requires care for Fibromyalgia, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing Denver Chiropractic Center. 303.300.0424.

Fibromyalgia and the Immune System

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a condition with a polarized audience comprised of those who believe it’s real and those who don’t. This interesting political-like conflict is, in a large part, centered around the topic we discussed last month concerning the causes of FM. This month’s article will focus specifically on the immune system and its relationship to FM.

“EXTRA, EXTRA, READ ALL ABOUT IT! New research published on 12-17-12 in BMC Clinical Pathology describes cytokine abnormalities were found in FM patients when compared to healthy controls.” OK! But what does that mean?

Very simply, this study reports that immune dysfunction is part of the cause of FM. The most exciting part is that this study identified a BLOOD TEST (finally!) that, “…demonstrates value as a FM diagnostic tool.” Looking at this closer, the researchers used multiple methods to examine cytokine (proteins that help regulate our immune response) blood levels in FM patients. They found the FM group had, “…considerably lower cytokine concentration than the control group, which implies that cell-mediated immunity is impaired in fibromyalgia.” This study’s findings of an immune response abnormality strays from previous study findings which largely pointed to the central nervous system (CNS – brain & spinal cord) as the origin of the FM syndrome.

This makes some sense as the study of immunology (in this case, “neuroimmunology” – the combination of neurology and immunology) has only been around for about 10 years, and as such, may hold some important answers as more evidence is uncovered to further support this potential “paradigm shift” in considering the primary cause of FM. The authors offer further excitement as this focus could lead to a better understanding of the cause of other neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS)! They go on by describing how body temperature, behavior, sleep, and mood can all be negatively affected by “pro-inflammatory cytokines” (PIC) which are released by certain types of activated white blood cells during infection. PIC have been found in the CNS in patients with brain injury, during viral and bacterial infections, and in other neurodegenerative processes (like MS)!

To further support this advance in understanding, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reported, “…Despite the brain’s status as an immune privileged site, an extensive bi-directional communication takes place between the nervous and the immune system in both health and disease.” They describe multiple signaling pathways that exist between the brain and the immune system that function normally throughout our lifetime. When immune, physiological, and psychological “stressors” occur, cytokines and other immune molecules stimulate interactions within the endocrine (our hormone) system, nervous system and immune system.

To prove this, brain cytokine levels go up following stress exposure and similarly go down when treatments are applied that alleviate stress. They list other conditions such as stroke, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s disease, MS, pain, and AIDS-associated dementia as being similarly affected as well. They also report that cytokines and other neuro-chemicals play a role in our neuro-development throughout our lifespan, help regulate brain development early in life and brain function throughout life, and how this all changes in the aging brain. There are also interactions of these immune chemicals that result in gender differences on brain function and behavior.

Needless to say, it will be very interesting to watch for additional developments along this line of research as it pertains to the FM patient and future treatment recommendations! Also, immune stimulation by chiropractic adjustments has been postulated as a benefit and this too may be better understood using this new research approach!

If you, a friend or family member requires care for FM, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing Denver Chiropractic Center!

What a week (pic), open your chest (video) and this week’s 1-Page Health News.

Denverback.com home.

After a week of fun with my family up in Beaver Creek, I’m back in the office rested and ready for work. I hope all of you had a great 4th. For those of you who are wondering, no, I did not see the bear again this year. Yes, I rode the Xterra Beaver Creek bike course 4 times, breaking my chain on the last day. I had to hike out and coast down through the streets of Bachelor Gulch to get back to the hotel. Here’s a pic of my kids up in the village in one of the rare moments when they weren’t fighting. Kidding. Sort of.

Weekly Health Update
Week of: Monday, July 8th, 2013

“Healthy citizens are the greatest asset any country can have.”
~ Winston Churchill
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Mental Attitude: The First Three Years and Aggression.
Children who witnessed domestic violence before age three were more likely to show aggression when they reached grade school, even if they were removed from their home and witnessed no domestic violence in the interim. According to Dr. Megan Holmes, the study’s lead author, “[This] gives social workers a window of opportunity between ages 3 and 5 to help the children socialize and learn what is appropriate behavior.”
Psychology and Psychiatry, March 2013

Health Alert: Alarming Cancer Rates
By 2020, nearly 47% of people will get cancer in their lifetime, but almost 38% will survive the disease. One reason more people are getting cancer is because we are living longer and the incident rate of cancer increases with an aging population. The reduction in the number of people dying of cancer is because more cases are diagnosed earlier and treatments and care are improving.
Macmillan Cancer Support, June 2013

Diet: TV Exposure?
More time in front of the TV set and higher exposure to TV ads leads to increased consumption of sweetened beverages among children. Each additional hour in front of the TV increased the likelihood of regular sweetened beverage consumption by 50%. Only one parent in seven indicated that they tried to reduce their children’s exposure to TV ads. The same parents stated that their children were less prone to drink soft drinks and other sweetened beverages. Children of parents who were less strict about TV ads were twice as likely to consume sweetened beverages every week.
University of Gothenburg, Sweden, June 2013

Exercise: Soccer and Diabetes.
After three months of soccer training, the hearts of diabetic men appeared to be 10 years “younger”. On average, soccer training reduced the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg. Maximal oxygen uptake was increased by 12% and that their intermittent exercise capacity was elevated by 42%.
University of Copenhagen, June 2013

Chiropractic: No Headaches
Cervical spine manipulation was associated with significant improvement in reducing headache symptoms involving patients with neck pain and/or neck dysfunction and headache.
Duke Evidence Report, 2001

Wellness/Prevention: Phones Not So Smart.
Smartphones and tablets can disturb sleep. The cause is due to the bright light-emitting diodes that can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that controls the natural sleep-wake cycle. Dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches (~.36m) from your face while using it will reduce these negative effects.
Mayo Clinic, June 2013

As always, thanks for reading,

Denver Chiropractic Center – Dr. Glenn Hyman, Dr. Jeff Stripling, Erin Young LMT & Natalie Aceves, office manager. Denverback.com home.

Our most watched video ever: Dr. Glenn & the bear, 4th of July week, and the 1-Page Health News

It was last year, 4th of July week up at Beaver Creek when I, Dr. Glenn Hyman, encountered my first bear. Having grown up in New Jersey it was a big deal to me. The video I shared reigns as our most watched video ever, and the link is below. The panicky guy who sounds an awful lot like me was some other person.

Next week, I’ll be back up in Beaver Creek for 4th of July week. This will be my second annual personal Xterra Beaver Creek training camp. If you’re up in the Vail / Beaver Creek area and want to ride the course next week, shoot me an email.

If you need to get in to see me here at Denver Chiropractic Center, call today 303.300.0424. I’m in all this week and out all next week.

Dr. Stripling will be in next Monday and Tuesday, and half of Wednesday before we close for the long 4th of July weekend.

Here is the 1-Page Health News:

Mental Health: Depression and Stroke Risk in Middle-Aged Women.
A 12-year study of over 10,000 middle-aged Australian women found that those who suffered from depression had nearly double the risk of stroke compared to non-depressed women in their same age group. The American Heart Association encourages everyone to learn how to recognize a stroke. Think F.A.S.T: F-Face Drooping. A-Arm Weakness. S-Speech Difficulty. T-Time To Call 9-1-1 (or the appropriate emergency services number if you’re outside the United States).
American Heart Association, May 2013

Diet: Brain Rewards.
Restricting food intake increases the reward value of food, particularly high-calorie and appetizing food. The more successful people are at caloric-restriction dieting, the greater difficulty they will face in maintaining the restriction. Dieting by skipping meals and fasting is less successful than weight loss efforts characterized by intake of low energy, dense, healthy foods. If people want to lose excess weight, it would be more effective to consume healthy, low-sugar foods during regular meals, rather than go for long periods of time without eating.
NeuroImage, May 2013

Exercise: It’s Not Too Late To Cut Heart Failure Risk!
In an eight year study, middle-aged participants drastically reduced their risk of heart failure up to 40% by increasing their cardiovascular fitness level.
American Heart Association, May 2013

Chiropractic: No Headaches!
Spinal manipulative therapy (aka adjustments) is an effective treatment for tension headaches. In a study, patients who received adjustments continued to benefit from care even four weeks after treatment concluded. This is in contrast to patients who received pharmaceutical therapy; they reverted to baseline values when checked a month after treatment ended.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 1995

Wellness/Prevention: Fish Oil, Your Heart, and Stress.
A new study finds that regular consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids (most commonly found in cold water fish like Salmon) improves cardiovascular health by dulling the connection between mentally stressful events and cardiovascular functions like heart rate, blood pressure, the fight-or-flight response, and blood flow. Those who frequently find themselves in stressful situations may benefit from adding Omega-3s to their diet.
American Physiological Society, May 2013
Video link: Dr. Glenn and the bear!

Video- if you can’t do this, you may have a problem, your odds needing back surgery, and this week’s 1-Page Health News

Hi Glenn,

Happy Monday! Well, the heat is back. And for most of us active people, that’s kind of a good thing. Maybe I’m odd, but I enjoy riding my bike on a really hot day.

There’s an interesting study from the journal Spine showing that back pain patients who started with a chiropractor were 28 times less likely to end up having surgery than patients who started by seeing a surgeon. (see below).

This week, Dr. Stripling has a great video for you on the chair squat. I know, you’re thinking, “The squat again?” Here’s the truth: there are a few basic movements that add up over time. If you can’t get yourself closer to the ground correctly, you wear out your spine. Then, one day, you go to tie a shoe, or pick up a bag of dog food, or sneeze – and blow your back out. We see it day in and day out in our office. So, after reading this week’s 1-Page Health News, I strongly suggest taking a look at this week’s video. Of course, if you have a bad back already, you should learn this under our supervision (call us). Proceed wisely!

Health Alert: What Concussion?
Many United States high school football players think it’s okay to play with a concussion even though they know they are at risk of serious injury. Over 90% of players polled recognized a risk of serious injury if they returned to play too quickly, but only 54% would always or sometimes report their concussion symptoms to their coach. Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Diet: Fight Inflammation!
Chronic inflammation is a condition that can be triggered by obesity and can ultimately lead to both cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Some foods that are known to combat unhealthy inflammation are citrus fruits, leafy greens, tomatoes, wild salmon, and whole foods high in fiber. University of Alabama at Birmingham, March 2013

Exercise: ‘Walkable’ Neighborhoods.
Preschool children are less likely to be obese if they live in a neighborhood that is safe and within walking distance of parks and retail services. Pediatric Academic Society, May 2013

Chiropractic: I Like Those Odds!
Patients who went to a chiropractor first had were less likely to undergo surgery than those who went to a surgeon first. 42.7% of workers with back injuries who first saw a surgeon had surgery, in contrast to only 1.5% of those who initially saw a chiropractor.  Spine, December 2012

Wellness/Prevention: Brain Power Boost.
Regularly consuming the healthy fats found in fish, extra virgin olive oil, and nuts may assist in maintaining cognitive functions in older individuals. British Medical.
Journal, May 2013.
Video link: Dr. Stripling shows you the chair squat. You really should be able to do this pain free.

Awesome Dog finds a great home:

I’m happy to report that Rooster has found a home. My good friend Dave Kupernick adopted Rooster from my other good friend Andrew Stone. Most of you know that Mr. Stone is the canine behaviorist who trained our 1-year old chocolate lab when she was a pup. If have a dog that has behavioral problems, I strongly recommend you have Mr. Stone help you get your dog “reprogrammed” and behaving in a more civilized manner. Call Andrew Stone directly at 720-366-2238

Marriage and weight gain, “Rooster” available, look for us at E-Rock, and this Week’s 1-Page Health News

After a beautiful Memorial Day weekend, we’re back in the office and ready to help you. This coming Sunday, Dr. Stripling and I will be out at the Elephant Rock Festival of Cycling giving ART treatments to athletes. Look for us under the Team Transplant tent. Lots of good stuff in this week’s 1-Page Health News

“Chiropractic is a wonderful means of natural healing.”
~ Bob Hope

Mental Attitude: Happily Married?
A recent study concludes that young and happily married newlyweds are more likely to gain weight than their young and unhappily married counterparts. For each unit increase in satisfaction, on average, males and females both gained one tenth of a BMI unit every 6 months – or about one pound a year. According to Dr. Andrea Meltzer, lead author of the study, “These findings challenge the idea that quality relationships always benefit health, suggesting instead that spouses in satisfying relationships relax their efforts to maintain their weight because they are no longer motivated to attract a mate. Interventions to prevent weight gain in early marriage may therefore benefit from encouraging spouses to think about their weight in terms of health rather than appearance.”
Health Psychology, April 2013

Health Alert: Less Salt, More Potassium.
Reducing salt intake can lower blood pressure, which ultimately reduces the risk of heart disease and stroke. Results show that four or more weeks of modest salt reduction leads to notable decreases in blood pressure. Increased potassium intake was associated with a 24% reduced probability of stroke in adults and may also have an advantageous impact on blood pressure in kids.
British Medical Journal, April 2013

Diet: So How Much Salt and Potassium Should You Consume?
The World Health Organization recommends adults should reduce salt intake to 5g per day and consume at least 3510mg of potassium per day.
World Health Organization, January 2013

Exercise: More Reasons.
Exercise helps to retard bone loss as you age, thereby reducing your risk of developing osteoporosis. Exercise also helps improves pain tolerance and mood if you already suffer from osteoarthritis.
Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health, 1996

Chiropractic: Satisfied Low Back Pain Patients.
Patients with chronic low-back pain treated by chiropractors showed greater improvement and satisfaction after one month of care than patients treated by family physicians. Satisfaction scores were higher for chiropractic patients. A higher proportion of chiropractic patients (56% vs. 13%) reported that their low-back pain was better or much better, whereas nearly one-third of medical patients reported their low-back pain was worse or much worse.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 2000

Wellness/Prevention: Sleep Well.
Increasing the number of hours adolescents sleep each night may reduce the prevalence of adolescent obesity. A recent study shows that fewer hours of sleep is associated with greater increases in adolescent body mass index (BMI) for participants between 14 and 18 years old. Increasing sleep from 8 to 10 hours per day at age 18 could result in a 4% reduction in the number of adolescents with a BMI above 25. This would translate to 500,000 fewer overweight adolescents.
Pediatrics, April 2013

Awesome Dog available for a great home:

My friend and canine behaviorist, Andrew Stone, has a dog that he is looking to place in a great home. Rooster is a STUNNING red and white border collie male, just over 2 yrs old, neutered, and now fully professionally trained (by Mr. Stone of course!). Know anyone interested? Re-homing fee applies. Mr. Stone has the fee set at $500 with lifetime training (a great deal!)……..or at $400 without the follow-up training. Rooster plays well with other dogs and is great with kids. Call Andrew Stone directly at 720-366-2238

How and why to avoid knee replacement surgery and this week’s !-Page Health News

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”
~ Hippocrates

Health Alert: Hip/Knee Replacement?
Joint damage from osteoarthritis is responsible for 80% of hip replacements and 90% of knee surgeries. Only 50% of individuals with arthritis who had a hip or knee replacement reported a significant improvement in pain and mobility after surgery. 25% of patients who get a single joint replacement will have another within two years.
Arthritis & Rheumatism, April 2013

“Did you know that if your spine is not moving well or is not aligned (known as subluxation of the spine), you could easily get an injury in your hips, knees, calves or ankles? This is because spinal subluxations inhibit the nervous system, leading to poor motor control. Reference- Seaman et al, JMPT; 18;21(4): 267-280.

Getting your spine adjusted regularly is the best way to keep your body moving well and keep those muscles firing. Our athletes who get adjusted regularly hold up better than the ones who wait for the pain to set it. Call us – 303.300.0424 – or just reply to this email.

Diet: Unleaded Please!
Levels of lead in rice imported into the United States (US) ranged from 6-12 mg/kg. For adults, the daily exposure levels from eating imported rice are 20-40 times higher than the Food and Drug Administration’s accepted levels. For infants and children, the daily exposure levels are 30-60 times higher. Lead is a neurotoxin that can damage the brain, and in young children whose brains are still growing, it can seriously diminish their capacity to learn and develop. It can disrupt children’s behavior, such as make them more aggressive, impulsive, and hyperactive. Lead increases blood pressure and causes cardiovascular diseases in adults.
American Chemical Society, April 2013

Exercise: Walking vs. Running.
Brisk walking can reduce a person’s risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol just as much as running can. The risk for first-time hypertension was notably reduced 4.2% by running and 7.2% by walking. The risk for first-time high cholesterol was reduced 4.3% by running and 7% by walking. The risk for first-time diabetes was lowered 12.1% by running and 12.3% by walking. The risk for coronary heart disease was lowered 4.5% by running and 9.3% by walking.
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, April 2013

Chiropractic: Lowering Blood Pressure.
Chiropractic adjustments to the upper neck were shown to lower high blood pressure. Researchers found a 14 mm Hg greater drop in systolic blood pressure, and 8 mm Hg greater drop in diastolic blood pressure following a cervical adjustment. This effect was greater than would result from two blood pressure medications given in combination, and it was adverse-event free.
Journal of Human Hypertension, March 2007

Wellness/Prevention: Vitamin D.
A hormone produced in the skin with exposure to sunlight, Vitamin D is also found in fish, fish liver oils, and egg yolks. Muscle function and recovery from fatigue has been shown to improve with Vitamin D supplementation, which is thought to enhance the activity of the mitochondria – the power plants of the cell.
Newcastle University, April 2013