Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman is back in the office at Denver Chiropractic Center

The grainy pic below catches me skiing this past Tuesday when I should have been working. You see, for some reason Cherry Creek Schools was closed for Presidents Day and the day after, this past Tuesday. So I played hooky and went skiing with Meredith and the kids. Winter Park had 3 inches of new snow the day before and it was just perfect up in the trees. But I am back in the office, ready to help you keep doing the things you love to do too. Call us 303.300.0424 or reply to this email to get to the front desk.

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Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Slight Signs of Lingering Brain Damage Seen in Young Athletes After Concussion.
A single concussion may cause young children to suffer minor, but lingering, brain damage. In a recent study, researchers used MRI scans to compare the brains of 15 children with a previous concussion to 15 similar kids who hadn’t suffered a concussion. They found that the brains of the concussion sufferers showed signs of subtle disruptions while utilizing attention- and thinking-related skills. The authors recommend longer-term and larger studies to determine if concussion-related alterations in brain function are associated with problems during adulthood.
International Journal of Psychophysiology, December 2015

Health Alert: Too Many Teens Exposed to Secondhand Smoke.
Nearly half of American teens who have never used tobacco are exposed to harmful secondhand smoke despite widespread laws banning smoking in public places. An analysis of data from over 18,000 middle school and high school students reveals that 48% reported being exposed to secondhand smoke in 2013. Investigators also found that secondhand smoke exposure was nine times higher among never-smoking teens with no smoke-free rules in their home and car than teens with 100% smoke-free homes and vehicles.
Pediatrics, February 2016

Diet: Omega-3 May Help Reduce Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.
If individuals at risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consume more omega-3 fatty acids, they may be able to decrease their chance of developing the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that usually affects the small joints in the hands and feet. Unlike osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of joints, causing a painful swelling that can eventually result in bone erosion and joint deformity. Investigators analyzed self-reported data about omega-3 consumption from 30 people who had autoantibodies for rheumatoid arthritis and 47 control patients who did not. They found only 6.7% of patients who had the autoantibodies for RA were taking omega-3 supplements, compared with 34.4% in the control group. Furthermore, they found blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids to be lower in those at risk for RA. Based on the findings, researchers recommend a healthy diet that includes fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as one to three grams of fish oil a day, for those who may be at risk for RA and perhaps other inflammatory diseases.
Rheumatology, September 2015

Exercise: Some Yoga Poses Increase Risks for Glaucoma Patients.
Yoga has become a very popular form of exercise in the United States due to its health benefits. However, a new study suggests that certain poses increase eye pressure and present risks for individuals with glaucoma. Glaucoma affects eyesight, usually due to a build-up of pressure in the eye (called intraocular pressure, or IOP), which can damage the optic nerve. The study found that participants experienced a rise in intraocular pressure in four yoga poses, which included downward dog, standing forward bend, plow, and legs up on the wall. Study author Dr. Jessica Jasien writes, “As we know that any elevated IOP is the most important known risk factor for development and progression of nerve damage to the eye, the rise in IOP after assuming the yoga poses is of concern for glaucoma patients and their treating physicians. In addition, glaucoma patients should share with their yoga instructors their disease to allow for modifications during the practice of yoga.”
PLOS ONE, December 2015

Chiropractic: Sleep Problems and Pain.
A recent study investigated the relationship between sleep problems and chronic pain, as well as other conditions. The study involved data on 1,753 participants and found an association between sleep problems and an increased risk for chronic pain and headaches, as well as an increase in the severity of both abdominal pain and musculoskeletal pain. The results suggest patients with musculoskeletal complaints should also be screened for sleep problems. (Note: If you are near Denver and have sleep problems because of pain we can help with chiropractic and Active Release! Call us 303.300.0424)
Pain, December 2016

Wellness/Prevention: Excess Mass in Mid-Life Increases Dementia Risk.
After reviewing data from 21 published studies, a team of researchers from Imperial College in London reports that individuals who are obese during later adulthood are 1.41 times more likely to develop dementia than those who maintain a healthy weight. Future research will assess how weight loss prior to mid-life influences dementia risk.
Age and Aging, January 2016

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center
303.300.0424
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Denver Chiropractic Center (Dr. Glenn Hyman, chiropractor): This Week’s One-Page Health News.

Denver Chiropractic Center (Dr. Glenn Hyman): This Week’s One-Page Health News.

Here is this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Sense of Purpose in Life May Boost Longevity and Heart Health.
New research suggests that having a sense of purpose might protect your heart and add years to your life. Scientists analyzed studies involving 136,000 individuals and found that those who felt strongly that their lives had meaning or that they were “useful” to others had a lower risk for heart disease and premature death than those whose lives felt less meaningful. Co-author Dr. Alan Rozanski writes, “The current findings are important because they may open up new potential interventions for helping people to promote their health and sense of well-being.”
Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, December 2015

Health Alert: The World Appears to Be a Safer Place.
Since 1990, there has been a significant declining trend in the rates of death and disability due to injury. The reduction in injuries can be taken as good news, but 4.8 million deaths globally in 2013 is still a large number, and efforts to reduce death and disability from injury worldwide must continue.
Injury Prevention, December 2015

Diet: Diets Are Becoming Sweeter.
Investigators analyzed global nutrition and discovered that sales of sugar-sweetened drinks are rising around the world in terms of calories sold per person per day, as well as volume sold per person per day. This finding is concerning for researchers as it is well known that greater added sugar intake can increase an individual’s risk for obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, December 2015

Exercise: Does Physical Activity Reduce Cardiovascular Risks in Seniors?
Though guidelines suggest the cardiovascular systems of those over 75 years old would benefit from regular physical activity, few studies have actually evaluated this relationship. Using ten years of data collected from 4,207 men and women, researchers found the more physically active the participant, the lower their risk for a heart attack or stroke. In one example cited by the authors of the study, the risks for heart attack and stroke were essentially cut in half among those who habitually walked at a 3 mph (~4.82 kmh) pace when compared with those who normally walked at a 2 mph (~3.21 kmh) pace.
Circulation, November 2015

Chiropractic: Diabetics More Likely to Have Musculoskeletal Pain.
Taiwanese researchers reviewed records concerning nearly 40,000 patients and found that young adults with type 2 diabetes were nearly 40% more likely than non-diabetics to experience musculoskeletal (MSK) pain during a ten-year time period. The most common causes for MSK-related doctor visits among diabetic patients were associated with lower back pain, pelvic pain, and pain in the limbs. Previous research had shown poor blood sugar control can lead to damage to the bones and nerves, which can increase a diabetic’s risk for musculoskeletal pain, particularly in the limbs. Additionally, other studies have found an association between the development of lower back pain (LBP) and reduced physical activity, high body-mass index, and a sedentary lifestyle, all of which are common among type 2 diabetics.
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Smoking and Poor Nutrition Affect Fertility.
For couples having difficulty getting pregnant, eating more fruits and vegetables along with not smoking may be good advice. Researchers followed the weekly activities of couples undergoing fertility treatment and found male smoking increased the risk of pregnancy loss, female smoking caused an adverse effect on ovarian reserve, and eating more servings of fruits and vegetables was associated with a greater likelihood of fertilization.
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, December 2015

As always, thanks for reading!

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center
303.300.0424

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center- This week’s 1-page health news

Our very popular rehab expert, clinical assistant and X-Ray tech, Kacee, told us last week that she and her son are moving back to North Dakota to be closer to family. Her last day will be June 18. So there’s still time to come on in and say goodbye to Kacee. She’ll be tough to replace.

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Leafy Greens May Protect Aging Brains.
An evaluation of the eating habits and mental abilities of over 950 older adults revealed that eating a single serving of leafy green vegetables per day may reduce an individual’s risk for dementia. The study found that those who consumed one or two servings of spinach, kale, mustard greens, collards, or similar vegetables on a daily basis experienced slower mental deterioration than those who ate no leafy greens at all. Dr. Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry and neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine writes, “It makes sense that leafy green vegetables would have an effect on mental health… We know generally that what you eat, or don’t eat, can affect your risk for high blood pressure and vascular disease, which can both then worsen the course of dementia.”
American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting, March 2015

New Broccoli Reduces Cholesterol.
Eating ten or more weekly servings of a new variety of broccoli has been demonstrated to reduce Low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol) levels by about 6%. This new broccoli variety known as Beneforte was bred to contain two to three times more glucoraphanin, a compound that is converted to sulphoraphane inside the body. Previous research has observed that sulphoraphane activates genes that keep the body from converting excess dietary fat and sugar into bad cholesterol.
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, April 2015

Exercise: Exercise Helps Fibromyalgia Patients.
An 18-week functional training program for women with fibromyalgia (FM) resulted in reductions in both pain and tender points along with a positive impact on their overall quality of life. If further studies verify these findings, such training (which consisted of two sessions of in-water exercise and one session of on-land exercise each week) could play an important role in helping FM patients maintain an independent lifestyle.
Modern Rheumatology, April 2015

Chiropractic: Could Migraines and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Be Linked?
Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome can increase an individual’s risk for migraine headaches, and migraines may increase the likelihood of one developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 26,000 Americans and found that the risk of migraine was 2.6 times higher in people with carpal tunnel syndrome. Similarly, the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was 2.7 times higher among migraine sufferers.
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, March 2015

What Part of the Day Do Teens Become Less Active?
While adolescents have been observed to be less physically active and spend more time performing sedentary activities as they grow older, no previous studies have analyzed how these changes occur during the course of a teen’s average week. In this study, 363 teens wore accelerometers at both age 12 and age 15, and researchers recorded how much time was spent each day being inactive or performing either light physical activity or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. They found that by age 15, participants were sedentary 7-8% more often during school hours and both after school and on weekends. Across the board, students spent about 7% less time performing light physical activities while moderate-to-vigorous activity levels remained largely unchanged. Due to the increase in sedentary time across all aspects of an adolescent’s week, the investigators recommend that future interventions intended to help teens become more active need to focus on both their in-school and after-school/weekend activities.
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2015

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center and this week’s 1-Page Health News

We are in the very final stages of our office remodel, and I’m happy to say that all of our treatment rooms are open again. During the construction, there were a few weeks where we had just one treatment room, and that’s why it was tough for some of you to get in to see us. We are truly sorry about the inconvenience, but we are fully operational once again! So if you need us, call us 303.300.0424 (or reply to this email to get straight to Natalie at front desk.)

Here’s this week’s 1-Page Health News:

Mental Attitude: Your Speaking Skills May Be the Key to Making Things Happen.
Investigators at the University of Chicago report that your voice may be instrumental in advancing your career. In the study, researchers found that evaluators were more moved to action by well-spoken pitches than well-written submissions.
Journal of Psychological Science, February 2015

Health Alert: New Data on E-Cigarette Use Among College Students.
Surveys completed by nearly 1,400 college students show that 30% have at least tried e-cigarettes. Among current e-cigarette users, 87% previously used another nicotine product and nearly 35% used other non-cigarette tobacco products during the previous month. The data also show that students who use e-cigarettes tend to have average or below-average grades.
Drug and Alcohol Dependence, April 2015

Diet: Salt Intake May Affect More Than Your Blood Pressure.
A new study warns that eating too much salt may damage your blood vessels, heart, kidneys, and brain, even if you don’t develop high blood pressure. Researchers say that even if people do not develop high blood pressure, excessive salt consumption can lead to reduced function of the inner lining of blood vessels, enlargement of the left ventricle of the heart, kidney function issues, and damage to the sympathetic nervous system.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, March 2015

Exercise: Can Exercise Improve Your Child’s Math Grades?
After performing physical fitness tests on 273 elementary school students, Indian researchers found that those with the greatest levels of aerobic fitness scored 8-11% higher on math tests than their least fit peers, even after adjusting for gender, socioeconomic status, and weight status. Because physical fitness could elevate a student’s grade from a C to a B or a B to an A, the researchers recommend educators and policymakers look for opportunities to promote physical activity during the school day.
PLOS ONE, March 2015

Chiropractic: Sitting Increases Back Pain Risk?
While most people think of back pain as resulting from strenuous physical activity, a new study finds that the more time an individual spends sitting each day at both home and work, the greater their risk for a back injury. In the study, researchers found that among a group of 201 blue-collar workers, those who spent the most time sitting on their average day were three times more likely to experience back pain when compared with those who sit the fewest hours on a given day.
PLOS ONE, March 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Insufficient Sleep Linked to Overnight Increases in Blood Pressure.
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that individuals who don’t sleep enough hours experience a rise in blood pressure and an elevated heart rate when they do sleep, the opposite of what occurs in those who get sufficient quality sleep. Researcher Dr. Naima Covassin explains, “We know high blood pressure, particularly during the night, is one of the major risk factors for heart disease, and Americans typically do not get enough sleep. For the first time, we demonstrated that insufficient sleep causes increases in nighttime blood pressure and dampens nocturnal blood pressure dipping by using a controlled study that mimics the sleep loss experienced by many people.”
Mayo Clinic, March 2015

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman celebrates Denver Chiropractic Center’s 17th birthday

In April of 1998, I started Denver Chiropractic Center is a tiny 1-room office on Yale. The front desk, the waiting room, and my treatment table were all in one little 400 square foot space. Now, 17 years later (April 1st is Denver Chiropractic Center’s 17th birthday), our newly remodeled office will feature 3 treatment rooms, a dedicated rehab room, an onsite digital X-ray suite, and a much bigger waiting room. We look forward to taking care of you for years to come in our brand new state-of-the art Chiropractic and Active Release facility!

Remember, we are OPEN during our remodel. We are now the first door on the left when you get off of the elevators. If you need us, call us! 303.300.0424, or reply to this email to get straight to Natalie at the front desk. Our schedule has been completely full most days, so don’t procrastinate :-). In fact I’ll be out Thursday and Friday this week for spring break, so really, don’t wait!

This week’s 1-Page Health News…
Mental Attitude: Do Smartphones Promote Mental Laziness?
Researchers assessed 660 individuals to compare smartphone usage among both analytical and intuitive thinkers. Intuitive thinkers use gut feelings and instinct when making decisions, while analytical thinkers tend to give more thought to solving problems. The team found that intuitive thinkers (and not analytical thinkers) regularly use their smartphone’s search engine rather than their own brains in an attempt to solve problems. The researchers conclude that smartphones enable intuitive thinkers to be even lazier thinkers than normal. Co-lead study author Dr. Nathaniel Barr adds, “Decades of research has revealed that humans are eager to avoid expending effort when problem-solving and it seems likely that people will increasingly use their smartphones as an extended mind.”
Computers in Human Behavior, March 2015

Diet: Mediterranean Diet Appears to Cut Heart Risks.
A study that included more that 2,500 Greek adults who were tracked for ten years found that those who closely adhered to a Mediterranean-style diet significantly lowered their risk of heart disease. The Mediterranean diet is high in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, fish, and olive oil. The researchers say that individuals who most closely followed the diet were 47% less likely to develop heart disease when compared with those who did not follow the diet as closely during the decade-long study. Study co-author Dr. Ekavi Georgousopoulou notes, “Because the Mediterranean diet is based on food groups that are quite common or easy to find, people around the world could easily adopt this dietary pattern and help protect themselves against heart disease with very little costs.”
American College of Cardiology, March 2015

Exercise: Exercise Is Good for the Brain!
Exercise may increase the size of brain regions involved with maintaining both balance and coordination, based on a study that compared MRI scans of identical twins. Researchers found that the twin who was more active possessed more brain volume in the areas of the brain related to movement. Study co-author Dr. Urho Kujala notes, “[the changes] may have health implications in the long-term, such as possibly reducing the risk of falling and mobility limitations in older age.”
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, March 2015

Chiropractic: Here’s Why High Heels May Cause Back Pain…
Wearing heels over two inches tall (or ~50mm) can increase the curve of the lumbar spine by about ten degrees, placing added pressure on the two lower lumbar disks (L5/S1 and L4/L5). This may be one explanation as to why low back pain complaints are more common among women who regularly wear high heels compared with those who do not.
European Spine Journal, March 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Getting Healthier Earlier Keeps Heart Failure at Bay Later in Life.
An analysis of more than 18,000 people tracked for over 40 years reveals the importance of healthy living during middle-age. A research team found that individuals who were obese and possessed hypertension and diabetes by age 45 were diagnosed with heart failure about 11 to 13 years earlier than those who had none of the three risk factors. Study leader Dr. Faraz Ahmad concludes, “The message from this study is that you really want to prevent or delay the onset of these risk factors for as long as possible. Doing so can significantly increase the number of years you are likely to live free of heart failure.”
American College of Cardiology, March 2015
As always, thanks for reading,

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center. This week’s 1-Page Health News

I know a lot of you loosely follow my triathlon racing ‘career’ and I really appreciate that. In 2015, I’ve signed up for 5 Xterra (off-road) triathlons. Xterra tris consist of a lake swim, a mountain bike ride, and a trail run. I’ll be working with Cody and Kathy Waite’s Endurance Performance Coaching group training program again this season.

 

Dr. Glenn’s 2015 Race schedule:

 

May 30 – Xterra Lory (Horsetooth Reservoir, Fort Collins, CO)

June 20 – Xterra Curt Gowdy (Wyoming)

July 18 – Xterra Beaver Creek (the sprint, Beaver Creek, CO)

August 8 – Xterra Snow Mountain Ranch (Winter Park, CO)

August 22 – Xterra Buffalo Creek (near Bailey, CO)

 

We hope to see lots of you out there racing this season and look forward to helping you stay healthy, strong, and moving in 2015!

 

This Week’s 1-Page Health News:

 

Mental Attitude: Full-Day Preschool Increases Readiness for Kindergarten.
Children who attend preschool full-time score better in areas such as language, math, socio-emotional development, physical health, literacy, and cognitive development when compared with kids who attend preschool for half the day. Lead author Dr. Arthur J. Reynolds writes, “Full-day preschool appears to be a promising strategy for school readiness… In addition to increased educational enrichment, full-day preschool benefits parents by providing children with a continually enriched environment throughout the day, thereby freeing parental time to pursue career and educational opportunities.”
JAMA, November 2014

Health Alert: ER Visits on the Rise in the US.
The number of emergency room visits in the United States (US) has risen from approximately 130 million in 2010 to an estimated 140 million in 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Nearly 30% of visits were for injuries, with the highest rates among individuals 75 years of age and older. Dr. Michael Gerardi, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, adds, “Given that our nation’s population is aging, and emergency departments have a critical role as the front line of responding to disasters and infectious disease outbreaks in America… we need to prepare for increased numbers of patients.”
American College of Emergency Physicians, November 2014

Diet: Get Kids Cooking to Promote Healthy Eating.
According to a new report, getting kids involved in cooking may make them more likely to choose healthier foods. The study found that cooking programs and classes for children seem to positively influence children’s food preferences and behaviors. Cooking education programs teach children about healthy foods and how to prepare them. These programs also stress the importance of eating five servings of fruits and vegetables every day. If parents are unable to enroll their kids in a cooking class, then they can achieve similar benefits by simply having their children help them while they prepare meals at home in their own kitchen.
Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice and Policy, November 2014

Exercise: Lowers Hypertension Risk.
Using data from treadmill stress tests and blood pressure measurements from over 57,000 older men and women, researchers determined that individuals who are in good physical shape have at least a 20% lower risk for hypertension than those who are out of shape.
JAMA, December 2014

Chiropractic: Why Does Your Back Hurt?
The back is a complicated structure of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles. Poor posture and spinal misalignment can leave you vulnerable to injury. You can sprain ligaments, strain muscles, rupture disks, and irritate joints, all of which can lead to back pain. While sports injuries or accidents can cause back pain, sometimes the simplest of movements—for example, picking up a pencil from the floor— can have painful results. If you have back pain, we can help you. Just call us at 303.300.0424

 

Now Hiring: We have an opening for a part time (20hrs / week) Practice Representative. You’ll be representing our office in the community, giving educational presentations and promoting our practice. You should be an outgoing friendly person with good communication skills. We’ll train you. Schedule is flexible, so this is a great job for a student. If you’re interested, reply to this email and let Natalie know. Thanks!

 

As always, thanks for reading,
Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center

Dr. Glenn Hyman’s Denver Chiropractic Center: More Pain-Free Days!

Chiropractic: More Pain-Free Days!
A randomized trial involving 400 chronic low back pain patients found patients who received a course of twelve spinal manipulation treatments experienced 22.9 more pain-free days and 19.8 more disability-free days over the next year compared with patients who received no treatment.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, June 2014

Whiplash – Can We Predict Long-Term Problems?

Whiplash (or the rapid acceleration forwards followed by deceleration or sudden stopping of the moving head during the whiplash event) occurs at a speed that is so fast, we can’t prepare for it. In other words, by the time it takes us to voluntarily contract a muscle to guard ourselves against injury, that rapid forward/backwards “whipping” of the head and neck is already over! When considering the details of the injury event, sometimes we lose focus on what REALLY matters. Is there a way to reduce the chances for a long-term chronic, disabling, neck pain / headache result? Last month, we found out that the long-term use of a cervical collar is NOT a good idea. What are some other ways to prevent long-term disability?

A very interesting study investigated the first 14 days of treatment during the acute stage of whiplash neck sprain injuries following a car accident. The researchers wanted to determine what long-term consequences resulted from two different treatment approaches. In one group (201 patients, 47% of the total group), the patients were encouraged to, “…act as usual,” and continue in their normal daily, pre-injury activities. The patients in the second group were given time off from work and were immobilized in a soft cervical collar during the first 14 days after the car crash. At the end of the 14 days, there was a significant reduction of symptoms between the first visit to the fifteenth day (24 hours after the 14 day initial treatment time frame in both groups). However, when evaluated at the six-month point, the group that continued their normal daily routine, did not take time off work, and did not wear a collar had, “…a significantly better outcome,” compared to the other group. This study supports that over-treatment with a collar and time off from work “sets people up” for adopting a “sick role” where the patient is overly-focused on their problem. This study parallels what we discussed last month and embraces the chiropractic philosophy to staying active, exercise, don’t use a collar, and the use of manipulation which exercises joints and keeps them from stiffening up, thus reducing pain and the fear of doing activity!

Another study looked at different presenting physical factors that might be involved in the development of long-term handicaps after an acute whiplash injury in a group of 688 patients. They measured these physical factors at three, six, and twelve month intervals and found the relative risk for a disability a year after injury increased with the following: 1) A 3.5 times disability increase with initial high pain intensity of neck pain and headaches; 2) A 4.6 times increase with initial reduced neck movement or ranges of motion; and 3) A 4 times greater chance with initial multiple non-painful complaints (such as balance disturbance, dizziness, concentration loss, etc.). In yet another study, both physical and psychological factors were found to predict long-term disability. These included initial high levels of reported pain and poor activity tolerance, older age, cold sensitivity, altered circulation, and moderate post-traumatic stress.

The “bottom line” is that as chiropractors who also use Active Release Techniques, we are in the BEST position to treat and manage whiplash injured patients based on the type of care we perform and offer. We promote exercise of muscles and joints, encourage activity not rest, and minimize dependence on medication, collars, and other negative treatment approaches.

Denver Chiropractic Center’s weekly health update

“I’m not afraid of death; I just don’t want to be there when it happens.”
~ Woody Allen
Mental Attitude: Hot Chocolate May Prevent Memory Decline.
Drinking two cups of hot chocolate a day may keep your brain healthier and prevent memory decline. Researchers found that cocoa with high antioxidant flavanols improved blood flow by about 8% to working parts of the brain in older individuals who consumed two cups of hot chocolate a day for 30 days. Memory and thinking skills also improved during the study period.
Neurology, August 2013

Health Alert: Email Apnea?
Tech consultant Linda Stone coined the term “email apnea” to describe the odd behavior of holding one’s breath while reading emails. This chronic breath holding can cause fatigue and increase tension in the body.
Forbes, July 2013

Diet: Young Children Drinking Sugar-Sweetened Beverages More Likely To Be Obese.
Based on a review of data from 9,600 children ages two to five, researchers found that regular consumers of sugary drinks were 43% more likely to be obese. Researchers concluded that parents should keep young children away from sugary drinks and instead offer water as a step toward decreasing excessive weight gain.
Pediatrics, August 2013

Exercise: Walk To Work To Lower Blood Pressure.
A recent study of 20,000 commuters showed that those who walked to work were 17% less likely to have high blood pressure than those who drove.
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, August 2013

Chiropractic: Maintenance Adjustments Benefit Chronic Low Back Pain.
Sixty patients with chronic, low back pain (>6 months) were randomized to receive either 12 treatments of sham adjustments over a one-month period; 12 treatments consisting of spinal adjustments over a one-month period; or 12 treatments over a one-month period, including maintenance spinal adjustments every two weeks for the following nine months. Patients were evaluated by pain and disability scores, generic health status, and back-specific patient satisfaction before, during, and after treatments for ten months. The maintenance group showed greater improvement in pain and disability scores at the 10-month evaluation. In the spinal adjustment group without maintenance treatment, the mean pain and disability scores returned to near their pre-treatment levels by the end of the study.
Spine, August 2011

Wellness/Prevention: Eating Garlic May Lower Risk of Lung Cancer.
According to researchers, eating raw garlic twice a week can decrease the risk of developing lung cancer by 44%. Data from individuals with lung cancer, as well as healthy subjects, was compiled through face-to-face interviews regarding information on diet and lifestyle habits, including how often they ate garlic. The study authors write, “Protective association between intake of raw garlic and lung cancer has been observed with a dose-response pattern, suggesting that garlic may potentially serve as a chemo-preventive agent for lung cancer.”
Cancer Prevention Research, May 2013