Home » Blog » Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman celebrates Denver Chiropractic Center’s 17th birthday

Denver Chiropractor Dr. Glenn Hyman celebrates Denver Chiropractic Center’s 17th birthday

In April of 1998, I started Denver Chiropractic Center is a tiny 1-room office on Yale. The front desk, the waiting room, and my treatment table were all in one little 400 square foot space. Now, 17 years later (April 1st is Denver Chiropractic Center’s 17th birthday), our newly remodeled office will feature 3 treatment rooms, a dedicated rehab room, an onsite digital X-ray suite, and a much bigger waiting room. We look forward to taking care of you for years to come in our brand new state-of-the art Chiropractic and Active Release facility!

Remember, we are OPEN during our remodel. We are now the first door on the left when you get off of the elevators. If you need us, call us! 303.300.0424, or reply to this email to get straight to Natalie at the front desk. Our schedule has been completely full most days, so don’t procrastinate :-). In fact I’ll be out Thursday and Friday this week for spring break, so really, don’t wait!

This week’s 1-Page Health News…
Mental Attitude: Do Smartphones Promote Mental Laziness?
Researchers assessed 660 individuals to compare smartphone usage among both analytical and intuitive thinkers. Intuitive thinkers use gut feelings and instinct when making decisions, while analytical thinkers tend to give more thought to solving problems. The team found that intuitive thinkers (and not analytical thinkers) regularly use their smartphone’s search engine rather than their own brains in an attempt to solve problems. The researchers conclude that smartphones enable intuitive thinkers to be even lazier thinkers than normal. Co-lead study author Dr. Nathaniel Barr adds, “Decades of research has revealed that humans are eager to avoid expending effort when problem-solving and it seems likely that people will increasingly use their smartphones as an extended mind.”
Computers in Human Behavior, March 2015

Diet: Mediterranean Diet Appears to Cut Heart Risks.
A study that included more that 2,500 Greek adults who were tracked for ten years found that those who closely adhered to a Mediterranean-style diet significantly lowered their risk of heart disease. The Mediterranean diet is high in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, fish, and olive oil. The researchers say that individuals who most closely followed the diet were 47% less likely to develop heart disease when compared with those who did not follow the diet as closely during the decade-long study. Study co-author Dr. Ekavi Georgousopoulou notes, “Because the Mediterranean diet is based on food groups that are quite common or easy to find, people around the world could easily adopt this dietary pattern and help protect themselves against heart disease with very little costs.”
American College of Cardiology, March 2015

Exercise: Exercise Is Good for the Brain!
Exercise may increase the size of brain regions involved with maintaining both balance and coordination, based on a study that compared MRI scans of identical twins. Researchers found that the twin who was more active possessed more brain volume in the areas of the brain related to movement. Study co-author Dr. Urho Kujala notes, “[the changes] may have health implications in the long-term, such as possibly reducing the risk of falling and mobility limitations in older age.”
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, March 2015

Chiropractic: Here’s Why High Heels May Cause Back Pain…
Wearing heels over two inches tall (or ~50mm) can increase the curve of the lumbar spine by about ten degrees, placing added pressure on the two lower lumbar disks (L5/S1 and L4/L5). This may be one explanation as to why low back pain complaints are more common among women who regularly wear high heels compared with those who do not.
European Spine Journal, March 2015

Wellness/Prevention: Getting Healthier Earlier Keeps Heart Failure at Bay Later in Life.
An analysis of more than 18,000 people tracked for over 40 years reveals the importance of healthy living during middle-age. A research team found that individuals who were obese and possessed hypertension and diabetes by age 45 were diagnosed with heart failure about 11 to 13 years earlier than those who had none of the three risk factors. Study leader Dr. Faraz Ahmad concludes, “The message from this study is that you really want to prevent or delay the onset of these risk factors for as long as possible. Doing so can significantly increase the number of years you are likely to live free of heart failure.”
American College of Cardiology, March 2015
As always, thanks for reading,